With the May 6 elections on the horizon, Community Impact Newspaper has gathered much of our reporting in one place to help Plano voters make sense of their choices.

Bookmark this page and refer back to it as a handy reference. We have included links to much of our reporting throughout the page, as well as detailed candidate platforms and other useful information.


IMPORTANT DATES

  • In-person early voting—April 24-29, May 1-2
  • Last day to apply for ballot by mail—April 25
  • Election day—May 6
    • Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on election day in all Collin County polling locations, including 13 voting centers in Plano.
    • Collin County residents may vote at any county location.
    • For a list of all Plano voting centers, see the interactive map at the bottom of this page.

PLANO CITY COUNCIL

Four races for spots on the Plano City Council will be on the May 6 ballot.

Four races for spots on the Plano City Council will be on the May 6 ballot. Cassidy Ritter

Four candidates are vying for Plano’s mayor seat, and eight others are running for three Plano City Council spots.

Before the election, Community Impact Newspaper sent the candidates a questionnaire on their background and what they plan to do, if elected. Click on the names below to read each candidate’s responses.

Plano mayor and council seats are elected at large, meaning residents may cast a vote for a candidate in each race.

PLANO MAYOR

CITY COUNCIL PLACE 2

CITY COUNCIL PLACE 4

CITY COUNCIL PLACE 8


PLANO ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Voters in the May 6 elections will consider candidates for four spots on the Plano ISD board of trustees.

Voters in the May 6 elections will consider candidates for four spots on the Plano ISD board of trustees. Cassidy Ritter

Twelve candidates are seeking seats on the Plano ISD board of trustees, where four spots are up for grabs.

Like council members, school board trustees are elected to their positions at large. As a result, Plano ISD voters may cast a vote for a candidate in each race.

Click on the names below to read more about each candidate’s qualifications and priorities for the district.

SCHOOL BOARD PLACE 1

SCHOOL BOARD PLACE 2

SCHOOL BOARD PLACE 3

* The candidate did not submit a response to Community Impact Newspaper’s questionnaire.

SCHOOL BOARD PLACE 6


COLLIN COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Seven candidates have filed to run for four at-large places on the Collin College board of trustees.

Six of the candidates have responded to a questionnaire about their qualifications and their vision for Collin College. Click on their names below to read their responses.

COLLIN COLLEGE BOARD PLACE 1

COLLIN COLLEGE BOARD PLACE 2

* The candidate did not submit a response to Community Impact Newspaper’s questionnaire.

COLLIN COLLEGE BOARD PLACE 3

COLLIN COLLEGE BOARD PLACE 5


PLANO CITY BOND PROPOSITIONS

Plano voters will also consider a series of bond-funded projects totaling $224.1 million.

To learn more about the city’s aging infrastructure and for historical context on these bond projects, read this story from our March edition of Community Impact Newspaper.

The bond projects will be broken down into six propositions. Voters will consider each proposition separately. Here is the order in which they will appear on the ballot:

  1. Street improvements—$90.3 million
  2. Public safety facilities—$29 million
  3. Park improvements—$78.9 million
  4. Recreation center amenities—$12.5 million
  5. Library facilities—$10 million
  6. Collinwood House and historic preservation—$3.5 million

Click on the graphic below to read more about what is in each bond proposition:

Plano bond graphic


COLLIN COLLEGE BOND REFERENDUM

In addition to the city bond requests, Plano voters will consider a $600 million bond proposal for future Collin College projects.

The majority of the bond will be to fund future campuses in Wylie, Farmersville and Celina, said Ken Lynn, Collin College chief financial officer. The bond will also fund a technical center on SH 121 and other college programs.

To learn more about the proposed projects and their projected fiscal impact, read the stories linked here.


VOTING LOCATIONS

Wondering where you can cast your vote, either on election day or in early voting? Look no further than the interactive map below. The map all includes voting locations in Plano city limits, although Plano residents in Collin County can also vote at any polling station in the county.

For the Plano residents who live in Denton County, the Parr Library is the only voting center available on election day. During early voting, these residents may vote at any Denton County location.

In the map below, blue markers represent early voting locations in Plano. Orange markers represent election day locations. (Some locations are available for both early and election day voting.)

Click on the icons to learn more, or visit this city page for a complete list of voting locations for Plano residents in Collin and Denton counties.

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