TxDOT officials select a bypass alignment for US 380 in Collin County

Collin County residents finally have an answer about solutions to relieve congestion on US 380.

Texas Department of Transportation officials are recommending a bypass for US 380 from the Denton County line to Hunt County line, according to details released at a meeting May 6 in McKinney. TxDOT’s preferred alignment is a combination of its previous options, which were labeled in earlier plans as Red A, Red D and Green B.

This preferred alignment will start in Prosper along US 380’s current alignment then run north between Ridge Road and Stonebridge Drive in McKinney, avoiding the Tucker Hill neighborhood. The alignment then continues east along Bloomdale Road. It reconnects with US 380 at Airport Drive. The alignment also connects US 380 to SH 121 west of the McKinney National Airport. The alignment also runs south of New Hope, north of Princeton and south of Farmersville.

Talk about ways to alleviate traffic congestion on US 380 began in April 2018 when TxDOT presented five proposed alignments for the roadway. Those were narrowed to two in October. In March, residents learned about two new proposed bypass segments being considered for US 380 in Collin County.

Construction on the nearly 33-mile roadway will not begin for another six to 10 years. The project could take 20 years to complete, according to TxDOT officials.

Prior to dirt turning, TxDOT will divide the road into independent projects and prioritize them. Then, an environmental study and design schematics will be done.

The environmental study looks at historic places, cemeteries and wetlands that might be affected by the alignment, TxDOT Public Information Officer Ryan LaFontaine said.

During the environmental study residents will be invited to several open houses and public meetings. The alignment presented May 6 may also slightly shift during the study, LaFontaine said.

The environmental study is expected to take two to four years to complete, LaFontaine said in an email.

Right-of-way acquisitions will take place during the environmental study, according to LaFontaine. He said right-of-way acquisitions and funding will take three to five years to complete.

Once the study is complete, a final design, construction plans and cost estimates will be determined.

TxDOT will host additional meetings from 6-8 p.m. May 7 at Princeton High School, 1000 E. Princeton Drive, Princeton, and from 6-8 p.m. May 9 at Lorene Rogers Middle School, 1001 Coit Road, Prosper. All meetings will be held in an open house format, with a presentation starting at 6 p.m., according to a news release. The same information will be given at all three meetings.

More information about the roadway can be found in Community Impact Newspaper’s previous coverage here.

Editor's note: The Texas Department of Transportation has also clarified its information and will still consider other alignment options.
By Cassidy Ritter
Cassidy graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Journalism and a double minor in business and global studies. She has worked as a reporter and editor for publications in Kansas, Colorado and Australia. She was hired as senior reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's Plano edition in August 2016. Less than a year later, she took the role of editor for the McKinney edition.


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