TxDOT releases 5 potential alignment options for US 380 in Collin County

During a meeting April 26, TxDOT officials shared five possible alignment options and three roadway options to relieve traffic and congestion on US 380.

During a meeting April 26, TxDOT officials shared five possible alignment options and three roadway options to relieve traffic and congestion on US 380.

Editor's note: The survey link for resident feedback has been updated.

The Texas Department of Transportation held the first of three public hearings Thursday night to discuss and receive public comments on its proposed US 380 project through Collin County from the Denton County line to the Hunt County line.

During the meeting, TxDOT officials shared five possible alignment options and three roadway options to relieve traffic and congestion on US 380.

“Funding for any type of improvements to US 380 has not yet been identified, which should tell you how early we are in this process,” TxDOT Public Information Officer Ryan Lafontaine said in an email. “But I can tell you that tolling is not being discussed as a possible means of funding.”

Roadway options include maintaining the existing alignment of four to six lanes. This option, in engineering terms, is rated an F level—or the worst level—of service, according to the presentation.

“In [Option 1], congestion would not be fully addressed and future county growth is likely to cause these issues to progress,” said Ceason Clemens, director of transportation, planning and development for TxDOT.

Option 2 is grade-separated intersections, which maintains the existing alignment but allows drivers to bypass select major intersections. Option 2, also rated an F, would have six lanes and frontage road lanes at some intersections but have a small effect on congestion, Clemens said.

Option 3 is a freeway, which involves multiple alignment options, improves safety and has no signalized intersections, according to the presentation. This option, in engineering terms, is rated a B level depending on the alignment.

“If a freeway were to be constructed, traffic congestion would decrease and speeds during peak traffic periods … throughout the corridor would increase,” Clemens said.

Alignment options include shifting the roadway farther north; shifting the roadway farther south; or moving a portion of the road to the northern section of McKinney and its extraterritorial jurisdiction, north of Princeton and south of Farmersville with a section of the road from SH 121 west of the McKinney National Airport. Other alignment options include moving a portion of the road to the northern section of McKinney and its extraterritorial jurisdiction, north of New Hope, north of Princeton and south of Farmersville or moving a portion of the road to the northern section of McKinney and its extraterritorial jurisdiction, north of Princeton and south of Farmersville with a section of the road from SH 121 east of the McKinney National Airport.

Shifting the roadway farther north keeps businesses on the south side of the road intact and shifting the roadway farther south keeps businesses on the north side of the road intact, said Josh Robinson, senior civil engineer at Burns & McDonnell, an engineering firm working with TxDOT to evaluate options on US 380.

In late 2018, TxDOT expects to have an implementation plan finalized for US 380. This would include a recommendation for long- and short-term improvements as well as regional action items, according to the presentation.

It will likely take 10-20 years before most of the projects are constructed and it is possible that the highest priority areas could see construction in as little as six years from now, pending funding, Lafontaine said.

TxDOT officials said they are working with cities, Collin County, the North Central Texas Council of Governments and the Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate future traffic needs, right of way preservation and acquisition and impacts on the environment, including how a corridor could affect residents who live near the surroundings, Clemens said during the presentation.

TxDOT has also been evaluating potential future options and officials said it is possible that other modes of transportation besides roadways could improve mobility in the region. Pedestrian facilities, including sidewalks, will be incorporated into future plans, according to the presentation.

The purpose of the feasibility study, which began in 2015, is to analyze potential roadway options for US 380, including improving the existing alignment or using alternative alignments that could require additional right of way, according to a press release from TxDOT.

Two additional public meetings will be held in May:

  • May 1, 6-8 p.m., at Princeton High School, 1000 E. Princeton Drive, Princeton

  • May 3, 6-8 p.m., at Rogers Middle School, 1001 Coit Road, Prosper


All three meetings will present the same information, and representatives from TxDOT and project consultants will be available to answer questions about the proposed project.

Citizens may submit comments online at www.surveymonkey.com/r/Drive380 until May 18.

More information about the study and potential alignments can be found online at www.keepitmovingdallas.com/projects/us-highways/us-380-feasibility-studies.
By Cassidy Ritter
Cassidy graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Journalism and a double minor in business and global studies. She has worked as a reporter and editor for publications in Kansas, Colorado and Australia. She was hired as senior reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's Plano edition in August 2016. Less than a year later, she took the role of editor for the McKinney edition.


MOST RECENT

Harvest Hall officially opened Feb. 6 in Grapevine as part of the Grapevine Main development. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)
Harvest Hall now open in Grapevine, new dining options in Fort Worth and more DFW news from February

Here are some of the top stories from the past month from the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

digital rendering of virus
Collin County Judge Chris Hill rescinds COVID-19 disaster declaration

Collin County’s declaration of local disaster in response to COVID-19 was rescinded Feb. 26 by Judge Chris Hill.

At its peak of power loss, the city had roughly 50,000 homes with interrupted power, many of which had prolonged outages, Plano City Manager Mark Israelson said. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Plano faces long-term impacts from storm; Collin County vaccine hubs resume service and more DFW-area news

Read the top business and community news from this week from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during a winter storm that hit Texas the night of Feb. 14. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
Legislators probe energy officials over power failures, lack of preparation heading into winter storm

The Texas Legislature held hearings Feb. 25 with energy companies including Oncor Electric Delivery and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas in response to last week’s historic winter storm, which left millions of Texans without electricity for days.

Chicken and waffles are served with syrup. (Courtesy Layered)
Layered offers breakfast, brunch and family-like bonds to McKinney

The breakfast and brunch restaurant, located at 111 E. Virginia St., McKinney, sees regulars visit on any given day.

The North Texas Municipal Water District has lifted its request for its member cities to reduce water use. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Collin County water supplier lifts water conservation request

With water demands returning to normal levels, the North Texas Municipal Water District has lifted its request to reduce nonessential water use within its service area, which includes the cities of Frisco, McKinney, Plano and Richardson.

The coffee and wine bar offers signature drinks, such as the Honey Bear Latte, made with honey and cinnamon, as well as food options, such as breakfast tacos, charcuterie boards, baked goods and snack boxes. (Courtesy Golden Boy Coffee Co.)
Golden Boy Coffee Co. opens in Plano; Black Rock Coffee Bar coming to Southlake and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

As many as 31 stores across nine states will be shuttered as Fry's Electronics shuts down due to market changes and the pandemic. (Courtesy Qygen, Wikimedia Commons)
Fry's Electronics calls it quits after nearly 36 years in business

As many as 31 stores across nine states will be shuttered as Fry's Electronics shuts down due to market changes and the pandemic.

A lone runner jogs on a snow-covered road in Austin. Transportation projects across the city were briefly paused due to Winter Storm Uri. (Jack Flagler/Community Impact Newspaper)
ERCOT: Texas power system was less than 5 minutes from collapse during winter storm

ERCOT's CEO offered details into what led to the massive blackouts that left millions of Texans in the cold last week.

The McKinney Planning and Zoning Commission supported a rezoning request that could allow cottage homes to be constructed on the Storybook Ranch property located at 3701 Custer Road, McKinney. (Rendering courtesy city of McKinney)
McKinney's Storybrook Ranch given initial green light to redevelop into cottage homes

The project includes about 240 units in one-, two- or three-bedroom options available for rent with oversized bedroom windows, privacy fences and yards.

The current McKinney Public Safety Building will become the new headquarters for the police department after the fire department headquarters are built. (Community Impact file photo)
Architect named to design new McKinney Fire Department HQ

The layout of the building will be determined by the Martinez Architects team as it moves through its process.

The Playful Studios building in downtown McKinney
Common Desk to open downtown McKinney location in Playful Studios building

The coworking space is expected to open in late May.