LOOK BACK: See how Cy-Fair residents responded to the COVID-19 pandemic

Cypress Yard Greetings added employees during the pandemic as business increased. (Courtesy Cypress Yard Greetings)
Cypress Yard Greetings added employees during the pandemic as business increased. (Courtesy Cypress Yard Greetings)

Cypress Yard Greetings added employees during the pandemic as business increased. (Courtesy Cypress Yard Greetings)

The coronavirus brought things to a halt when the pandemic hit Cy-Fair in mid-March. Local schools moved instruction online after spring break, many residents began working from home and most businesses were forced to temporarily close their doors.


Despite facing uncertainty of the future, Cy-Fair residents came together to support one another, and businesses got creative to continue meeting needs. Take a look back at our coverage from the spring to see how the community responded to COVID-19.

  • Businesses and restaurants saw their sales drop in the wake of stay-at-home orders and restrictions enacted to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Eateries pivoted to offer takeout and delivery services to stay afloat and meet customers’ needs.

  • Local churches and religious organizations moved services online to keep their congregants safe and engaged. Upon regathering, faith leaders have continued to find creative ways to worship and connect in the community.

  • Neighbors took to social media to contribute donations and time to serve residents who could not leave their homes due to the risk of contracting COVID-19.

  • Social media was also used for good when it came to coordinating ways to make birthdays special for local children who could not celebrate as usual—from car parades to yard greetings.

  • Nonprofits saw an all-time high level among Cy-Fair residents for assistance—especially when it came to putting food on the table.

  • Cy-Fair hospitals ramped up their efforts to treat local residents afflicted by the virus and keep their employees safe by securing personal protective equipment. Senior living centers in the community offered virtual visits with residents’ loved ones unable to see them in person.

By Danica Lloyd

Editor, Cy-Fair

Danica joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in 2016. As editor, she continues to cover local government, education, health care, real estate, development, business and transportation in Cy-Fair. Her experience prior to CI includes studying at the Washington Journalism Center and interning at a startup incubator in D.C., serving as editor-in-chief of Union University's student magazine and online newspaper, reporting for The Jackson Sun and freelancing for other publications in Arkansas and Tennessee.