Clear Creek ISD adopts 2020-21 tax rate

The adopted rate is the lowest possible rate the district can approve without being penalized by the state while also allowing for full funding, based on the formula used to calculate tax rates. (Courtesy Pexels)
The adopted rate is the lowest possible rate the district can approve without being penalized by the state while also allowing for full funding, based on the formula used to calculate tax rates. (Courtesy Pexels)

The adopted rate is the lowest possible rate the district can approve without being penalized by the state while also allowing for full funding, based on the formula used to calculate tax rates. (Courtesy Pexels)

Clear Creek ISD’s board of trustees approved the district’s fiscal year 2020-21 tax rate, an approximately five-cent decrease from FY 2019-20, during a regular board meeting Sept. 28.

The adopted tax rate is $1.2659 per $100 valuation, which consists of two components: the maintenance and operation tax rate of $.9359 and the interest and sinking tax rate of $0.33.

The rate exceeds the no-new-revenue tax rate of $1.22. The adopted rate is the lowest possible rate the district can approve without being penalized by the state while also allowing for full funding, based on the formula used to calculate tax rates, said Paul McLarty, deputy superintendent of business and support services, during the meeting. Unlike with a government municipality, the district does not keep all of the funds raised through taxes, officials said.

In 2019, the approved rate was the lowest the district had seen in 27 years. In the last two years alone, the tax rate has decreased by $0.1341. This year, the maintenance and operation tax rate decreased by 3.41 cents due to House Bill 3, McLarty said.

The tax rate has been steady at $1.40 per $100 valuation since FY 2013-14, but the rate dropped to $1.31 per $100 valuation for FY 2019-20, mostly due to House Bill 3. The rate included a $0.97 rate for maintenance and operations and a $0.34 rate for debt service.


The board of trustees approved the district’s FY 2020-21 budget, which is projected to be $9.2 million higher than the budget in FY 2019-20, at its regular meeting Aug. 24. About $0.63 of every dollar in the budget goes directly to classroom instruction, officials said Aug. 24. In all, 51 full-time positions were added to the budget for FY 2020-21.

The total general operating fund is $370.5 million. McLarty said Sept. 28 the state is providing the district with less funding this year, while local funding is increasing.

The board also authorized an order Sept. 28 allowing the district’s financial adviser to refund more than $114 million word of bond money. The series 2012 bonds can be refunded, delivered and closed in mid-November, according to information presented at the meeting.

Based on current estimated rates, there is an estimated savings of almost $9.9 million in future debt service payments if these bonds are refunded. Authorization of the order will allow the financial adviser to refund these bonds at the most favorable time to achieve maximum savings to the district.

By Colleen Ferguson

Reporter, Bay Area

A native central New Yorker, Colleen worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact Newspaper before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. She covers public education, higher education, business and development news in southeast Houston. Colleen graduated in 2019 from Syracuse University and the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she worked for the university's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange. Her degrees are in journalism and Spanish language and culture. When not chasing a story, Colleen can be found petting cats and dogs, listening to podcasts, swimming or watching true crime documentaries.


<

MOST RECENT

Harris County Commissioners Court's revised redistricting map as of Aug. 31. (Screenshot courtesy Harris County Commissioners Court)
Harris County Commissioners Court to take public comments on redistricting Oct. 21

The meeting will be held at the Harris County Commissioners Court, located at 1001 Preston St., Ste. 934, Houston, at 4 p.m.

A model home is anticipated to open later this year. (Courtesy of McGuyer Homebuilders)
Coventry Homes begins sales in Webster

The community along NASA Parkway features a playground, dog park and open green space with 25 acres of protected wetlands; it is located within Clear Creek ISD boundaries.

The new H-E-B store is located on Ronald Reagan Boulevard in north Leander. (Taylor Girtman/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI NATION ROUNDUP: New H-E-B in Leander opening soon; Texas Supreme Court grants rehearing for high-speed rail eminent domain case and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across all of Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas as of Oct. 18.

Texas Medical Center: Coronavirus patient numbers drop 25% in one week, dip below 800

The number of COVID-19 patients hospitalized at Texas Medical Center institutions has continued its decline.

New-case rates are roughly equivalent to those seen in mid-April, according to weekly case count trends reported by the Galveston County Health District. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
COVID-19 hospitalizations, deaths decrease in Galveston County and other updates

Case fatality remains at 1%, and 2,133 cases are active—down significantly from the 3,755 active as of Oct. 1.

Friendswood ISD Superintendent Thad Roher address the attendees. (Sierra Rozen/Community Impact Newspaper)
Southeast Houston superintendents speak on COVID-19 challenges, expansions for 2021-22 school year

Hosted in League City, the panel consisted of the superintendents from Clear Creek ISD, Dickinson ISD, Friendswood ISD, Galveston ISD, Hitchcock ISD, Texas City ISD and Odyssey Academy. 

Phase 3A of Exploration Green, a 178-acre flood control project in the Clear Lake area, is now complete. (Courtesy Exploration Green Conservancy)
Phase 3A of Exploration Green now complete

Phase 3A of Exploration Green, a 178-acre flood control project in the Clear Lake area, is now complete.

A conceptual rendering shows what a high-speed rail station in Dallas could look like. A final design on the station has not yet been released. (Courtesy Texas Central)
Reversing course, Texas Supreme Court grants rehearing for high-speed rail eminent domain case

In the Oct. 15 order granting a rehearing, the Supreme Court set a date of Jan. 11 to hear oral arguments.

The amended version of the planned development unit will now go to the Austin Planning Commission for review. (Rendering courtesy Austin Environmental Commission)
CI NATION ROUNDUP: Austin commission OKs development plan near Lady Bird Lake; shopping center coming to Porter and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across all of Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas as of Oct. 15.

Through most of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of apartments were offering some kind of concession as a way to entice renters. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Rising apartment rent continues to be trend in Houston region

​​​​​​​According to data from ApartmentData.com, Houston has seen an average 12.8% rental rate growth in the past year.

The Houston-Harris County Emergency Rental Assistance Program has helped local families avoid eviction during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Courtesy Pixabay)
Harris County evictions trending up as federal moratorium ends

More than 1,200 eviction cases were filed in Harris County the week of Sept. 20—the highest weekly number since before the pandemic.