UPDATED: With accountability ratings looming, TEA shows leniency to districts affected by Harvey

Construction is ongoing at Moore Elementary School in Cy-Fair ISD, which was damaged during Hurricane Harvey.

Construction is ongoing at Moore Elementary School in Cy-Fair ISD, which was damaged during Hurricane Harvey.

Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath announced in June that school districts directly affected by Hurricane Harvey could be eligible for special evaluation in the state’s accountability system this year.

On Aug. 1, the TEA released a list of 83 school districts that are eligible for the provision based on certain standards:

Aldine ISD
Alief ISD
Alvin ISD
Anahuac ISD
Angleton ISD
Aransas County ISD
Aransas Pass ISD
Austwell-Tivoli ISD
Barbers Hill ISD
Beaumont ISD
Bloomington ISD
Boling ISD
Brazosport ISD
Bridge City ISD
Buna ISD
Burkeville ISD
Calhoun County ISD
Channelview ISD
Clear Creek ISD
Cleveland ISD
Coldspring-Oakhurst CISD
Columbia-Brazoria ISD
Cypress-Fairbanks ISD
Danbury ISD
Dayton ISD
Deer Park ISD
Devers ISD
Deweyville ISD
Dickinson ISD
East Chambers ISD
El Campo ISD
Evadale ISD
Fort Bend ISD
Friendswood ISD
Galena Park ISD
Galveston ISD
Goose Creek CISD
Gregory-Portland ISD
Hamshire-Fannett ISD
Hardin-Jefferson ISD
Hitchcock ISD
Houston ISD
Huffman ISD
Hull-Daisetta ISD
Humble ISD
Ingleside ISD
Katy ISD
Kirbyville CISD
Kountz ISD
La Grange ISD
Lamar CISD
Liberty ISD
Little Cypress-Mauriceville CISD
Lumberton ISD
Nederland ISD
Needville ISD
Orangefield ISD
Palacios ISD
Pasadena ISD
Port Aransas ISD
Port Arthur ISD
Port Neches-Groves ISD
Refugio ISD
Rice CISD
Royal ISD
Runge ISD
Santa Fe ISD
Sheldon ISD
Silsbee ISD
Spring Branch ISD
Spring ISD
Spurger ISD
Sweeny ISD
Taft ISD
Tarkington ISD
Texas City ISD
Victoria ISD
Vidor ISD
Weimar ISD
West Hardin County CISD
West Orange-Cove CISD
Wharton ISD
Woodsboro ISD

Accountability ratings in 2018 will be generated using available data. However, if a campus meeting the criteria receives an “Improvement Required” rating, the campus will instead be labeled “Not Rated,” according to the TEA.

Additionally, if a district or open-enrollment charter school meets the criteria and receives a B, C, D or F rating, they will also be labeled “Not Rated.”

Under the Hurricane Harvey Provision, criteria are based on data reported to the state in the 2017-18 school year, such as the number of displaced students and teachers and the effects Harvey had on instructional time and school facilities.

The Hurricane Harvey Provision applies to campuses meeting at least one of the following criteria:

  • The campus identified at least 10 percent of enrolled students as displaced or homeless due to Harvey.

  • The campus reported at least 10 percent of its teachers experienced homelessness after Harvey.

  • The campus was closed for 10 or more instructional days due to Harvey.

  • The campus was displaced due to Harvey either by geographic location or the student population was required to share its own campus facility with displaced students from another campus.


If all campuses within a district are labeled “Not Rated” under the Hurricane Harvey Provision, the district will receive the same rating.

Accountability ratings are given to districts and individual campuses every year across the Texas public education system. Ratings for the 2017-18 school year are set to be released later in August.

The A-F grading system will be used to rate districts for the first time this year after undergoing changes during the 2017 Legislative Session. Districts are rated based on student achievement, school progress and closing performance gaps. State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness scores—or STAAR scores—are to account for less than 50 percent of accountability metrics at the high school level, according to system guidelines.

Individual campuses will be rated based on the existing "Met Standard" system for the 2017-18 school year and will move on to the A-F system in the 2018-19 school year.

For more information, visit www.tea.texas.gov/hurricaneharveyprovision.
By Danica Lloyd
Danica joined Community Impact Newspaper as a Cy-Fair reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a journalism degree from Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. She covers education, local government, business, demographic trends, real estate development and nonprofits.

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