UPDATED: Here's how to watch the historic May 30 SpaceX rocket launch

On May 27, SpaceX will launch NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. This marks the first time in nearly a decade U.S. astronauts have launched from the U.S. (Courtesy NASA Television)
On May 27, SpaceX will launch NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. This marks the first time in nearly a decade U.S. astronauts have launched from the U.S. (Courtesy NASA Television)

On May 27, SpaceX will launch NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. This marks the first time in nearly a decade U.S. astronauts have launched from the U.S. (Courtesy NASA Television)

Updated 3:50 p.m. May 27

The SpaceX launch scheduled for the afternoon of May 27 was postponed due to weather. Liftoff has been rescheduled for May 30 at 3:22 p.m. EST.




Originally posted 11:24 a.m. May 27

For the first time since 2011, NASA astronauts are launching today from U.S. soil to space.

Astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley will be flying aboard SpaceX’s Crew Dragon Falcon 9 spacecraft, lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:32 p.m. CST. The duo will fly to the International Space Station for the Demo-2 mission, the duration of which is to be determined.


As the final flight test for SpaceX, the mission will validate the company’s crew transportation system, including the launch pad, rocket, spacecraft and operational capabilities, according to a Space Center Houston blog post. This also will be the first time NASA astronauts will test the spacecraft systems in orbit.

You can watch the historic moment via NASA Television. The stream began at 11 a.m. CST with live views of the rocket on Launch Pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center.

Since NASA's Space Shuttle program ended in July 2011, NASA astronauts have been launching from Russia to reach the ISS. May 27 marks a historic return to an era of launching American astronauts from American soil, officials have said.



Astronauts spend their days at the Johnson Space Center in Clear Lake, furthering NASA’s mission to explore space. But before they can strap into a rocket, they must first spend two years in basic training as astronaut candidates followed by years of mission-specific training—and before that, they must be among the talented few selected by NASA from a pool of thousands of wannabe space explorers. The latest candidate group graduated in January.

January’s 11 graduates, who have been officially added to the Astronaut Corps, were the first to complete training under the Artemis program, which is NASA’s designation for the manned spaceflight program that will land crews on the moon and, eventually, Mars. For more about the role of the Johnson Space Center in the Bay Area, click here.

By Colleen Ferguson

Reporter, Bay Area

A native central New Yorker, Colleen worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact Newspaper before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. She covers public education, higher education, business and development news in southeast Houston. Colleen graduated in 2019 from Syracuse University and the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she worked for the university's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange. Her degrees are in journalism and Spanish language and culture. When not chasing a story, Colleen can be found petting cats and dogs, listening to podcasts, swimming or watching true crime documentaries.