City Council recommends potential US 380 alignment through McKinney

McKinney City Council passed a resolution Dec. 15 in favor of alignment B, shown in this image. (Courtesy city of McKinney)
McKinney City Council passed a resolution Dec. 15 in favor of alignment B, shown in this image. (Courtesy city of McKinney)

McKinney City Council passed a resolution Dec. 15 in favor of alignment B, shown in this image. (Courtesy city of McKinney)

McKinney City Council passed a resolution in favor of a possible alignment on US 380 through the city from the Texas Department of Transportation at its Dec. 15 meeting.

Alignment B was introduced several weeks ago and is more closely aligned with what the city of McKinney had been suggesting to TxDOT for this section, Mayor George Fuller said. This alignment would create an alternate route to US 380 and take traffic west along a curving road from Ridge Road to Coit Road, where it would intersect US 380 again.

The city stated in its resolution that it believes Segment B “provides a high value of both managing congestion and improving east-west mobility over the May 2019 recommended freeway alignment.” The resolution went on to credit this to Segment B’s “more gradual and direct divergence” from the existing US 380 and its ability to reduce congestion at the existing major intersection of US 380 and Custer Road by increasing separation from a freeway.

In addition, the resolution affirms the city’s opposition of an alignment for a potential freeway along US 380, depicted as Segment F. This alignment would convert US 380 into a limited access roadway, the resolution stated.

Segment A also received verbal opposition from City Council. The resolution acknowledges that this segment will be studied, but emphasizes the preference for Segment B.


The US 380 project from TxDOT is meant to alleviate current and future congestion on US 380, but a solution has yet to be identified.

TxDOT recommended a bypass alignment for US 380 in May 2019 despite concerns raised by city and Collin County officials. This recommended alignment is estimated to cost almost $2.6 billion, according to documents.

The environmental impact study will begin in 2021 and would take at least a year to complete, according to meeting documents.
By Miranda Jaimes

Editor, Frisco & McKinney

Miranda joined Community Impact Newspaper as an editor in August 2017 with the Grapevine/Colleyville/Southlake edition. In 2019 she transitioned to editor for the McKinney edition. She began covering Frisco as well in 2020. Miranda covers local government, transportation, business and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Miranda served as managing editor for The Prosper Press, The Anna-Melissa Tribune and The Van Alstyne Leader, and before that reported and did design for The Herald Democrat, a daily newspaper in Grayson County. She graduated with a degree in journalism from Oklahoma Christian University in 2014.