When and where to vote early in Keller, Roanoke and northeast Fort Worth

Voting booths
Both Tarrant and Denton county residents can vote at any county voting location during the early voting period. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Both Tarrant and Denton county residents can vote at any county voting location during the early voting period. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Early voting for the Nov. 2 joint general and special elections begins on Oct. 18. Here is when and where Keller, Roanoke and northeast Fort Worth residents can vote.

For Keller and northeast Fort Worth residents, Tarrant County will hold early voting Oct. 18-22 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 23 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Oct. 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Oct. 25-29 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Denton County, which encompasses Roanoke, is hosting early voting Oct. 18-23 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Oct. 25-29 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Both Tarrant and Denton county residents can vote at any county voting location during the early voting period. The main early voting site in Tarrant County is the Tarrant County Elections Center, located at 2700 Premier St. in Fort Worth. For a full list of Tarrant County early voting locations, click here.

Denton County’s main early voting location is at the Denton County Elections Administration building at 701 Kimberly Drive, Room A111, in Denton. For a full list of Denton County early voting locations, click here.


In addition to eight state propositions, Tarrant County voters will see two countywide propositions on their ballots. Proposition A is calling for $400 million in bonds to be issued to improve traffic flow and reduce congestion within the county, in addition to a tax imposition to cover the principal and interest on the bonds, according to Tarrant County’s website.

The county’s Proposition B is calling for $116 million in bonds for buying and constructing a criminal district attorney office building and a tax imposition to cover the principal and interest on the bonds, the website stated.

Keller voters will also decide whether to reauthorize the city’s Crime Control and Prevention District for another 15 years. The district is funded by quarter-cent sales tax, which helps cover Keller Police Department projects, vehicles and equipment.
By Bailey Lewis
Bailey Lewis covers the cities of Grapevine, Colleyville and Southlake, as well as Keller, Roanoke and northeast Fort Worth. In December 2020, she graduated from the University of Oklahoma with her Bachelor's degree in journalism. Previously, she worked and interned for various publications, such as Local Profile, the OU Daily, the Malheur Enterprise and News21. When she's not writing, she enjoys spending time with her cat and watching documentaries.