Zoning approved for new 50-acre mixed-use development in Leander

The city council voted unanimously for the first zoning reading of the property the rezoning unanimously. (Screenshot courtesy city of Leander)
The city council voted unanimously for the first zoning reading of the property the rezoning unanimously. (Screenshot courtesy city of Leander)

The city council voted unanimously for the first zoning reading of the property the rezoning unanimously. (Screenshot courtesy city of Leander)

Image description
The PUD is residential and general commercial. (Screenshot courtesy city of Leander)
Image description
The homes in the residential portion of the development will feature cottage house architecture. (Screenshot courtesy city of Leander)
Updated Aug. 19, 7:58 p.m.

A development that will build 123 cottage-style homes, 70 two-family duplexes and commercial development will move ahead in Leander. The Monarch PUD will be located northwest of the intersection of US 183 and 183A Toll.

Leander City Council approved the zoning change for a planned unit development and the related annexation case Aug. 19 in unanimous votes.

The planned unit development changes include an added masonry wall between the residential and commercial areas and between the north and west property lines, according to city documents. There will also be increased building setbacks next to single-family uses that are not part of the development, per the PUD notes.

Posted Aug. 9


Leander City Council gave first zoning approval for a mixed-use development despite concerns from neighboring residents.

The council voted unanimously to approve the first reading to rezone the property, located at 3200 and 3300 US 183, to a planned unit development on Aug. 5. The 49.8-acre development has a proposal to include 123 cottage-style homes, 70 two-family duplexes, 15.63 acres of general commercial development and 5.44 acres of parks/open space. The second zoning reading is scheduled for Aug. 19.

City council also unanimously approved the first reading of the annexation of 29.46 acres of land in order to approve the zoning application, which will be considered for final approval Aug. 19. The city's planning and zoning commission unanimously recommended denial of the applicant's request due to a number of concerns, such as no street lights present in the proposal and the need for a setback area between the commercial and residential development. The applicant addressed all concerns other than the setback area, Planning Director Robin Griffin said to city council.

Some residents of neighboring subdivisions oppose the development project. Leander residents present at the meeting said more traffic will enter the area and worsen traffic flow. Others cited privacy concerns as part of the proposed wall between the subdivisions is a metal rod fence.

Leander resident Grover Mitchell said the development will make flooding problems worse in the area.

“The density of the [development] proposal is extremely high,” Mitchell said. “[Any flooding] is going to run down right into Wiley Creek Estates Subdivision right across the road. There’s no impervious ground cover. It’s all pasture land.”

Aware of the water drainage issue, Monarch PUD representative Brian Birdwell said they are speaking with the city to adequately address it.

“We know there are going to need to be some improvements made so that the same flow rate that is going there today can be conveyed in a better manner down to the creek where ultimately this water goes,” Birdwell said. “We are legally bound to not making it worse, but we are committed to making it better.”

In response to resident concerns, Council Member Chris Czernek said the council cannot deny the applicant's request because of the city’s rapid growth.

“As someone who sells homes for a living and has homes built behind us too, this is also part of a growing city as well, whether you agree with it or not,” Czernek said. “However, I hear you at the same time.”

Editor's note: This article previously said final approval was given for the zoning case and annexation case. This article has been corrected to say the first reading for the zoning change and annexation was approved Aug. 5 and the final readings are scheduled for Aug. 19.
By Trent Thompson

Reporter, Austin Metro

Trent joined Community Impact Newspaper as an intern in May 2021 after graduating with a degree in journalism from the University of Texas, Austin in December 2020. In July 2021, he was promoted to Austin Metro reporter. He covers several news beats from education and government to dining, transportation, nonprofits, and healthcare. However, his primary beat is business and development. Before working at CI, Trent wrote for The Daily Texan, UT's daily student newspaper, and worked on many projects of his own for his undergraduate program. In his free time Trent writes poetry, spends time with loved ones, and watches Star Wars for the hundredth time, including other new movies.

By Taylor Girtman

Reporter, Cedar Park and Leander

Taylor Girtman became the reporter for the Cedar Park-Leander edition in February 2020. She has a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Florida.



MOST RECENT

Want to know more about new businesses coming to the area? Below you can find details on the five latest commercial permits filed in Round Rock, Pflugerville and Hutto. (Photo courtesy Canva)
Check out the 5 latest commercial permits filed in Round Rock, Pflugerville and Hutto

The following commercial permits for new businesses or renovations to existing ones have been filed in the past two weeks through the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation.

The downtown Round Rock location of Lamppost Coffee will reopen Sept. 27, according to signage recently added to the front door. (Brooke Sjoberg/Community Impact Newspaper)
Lamppost Coffee to reopen in downtown Round Rock during the week of Sept. 27

The downtown Round Rock location of Lamppost Coffee will reopen "the week of Sept. 27," according to signage recently added to the front door.

Attendees will be able to learn about the redistricting process and ask questions about the factors that drive redistricting. (Community Impact Staff)
Rezoning in downtown New Braunfels paves the way for future development

The property located at 157 S. Guenther Ave. was rezoned to a central business district. Plans are underway for a new development on the adjacent property.

The zone will provide additional funding for public improvements within the area. (Community Impact Newspaper)
Third reinvestment zone approved in downtown New Braunfels

The zone will provide additional funding for public improvements within the area.

A new development will be coming to east Kyle. (Courtesy Texas Department of Transportation)
New development will bring homes, shops and an elementary school to east Kyle

A new development on 318 acres of land is coming soon to Kyle.

Pflugerville Fire Chief Ron Moellenberg's last day will be Sept. 30. (Courtesy Travis County ESD No. 2)
Pflugerville Fire Chief Ron Moellenberg to retire this month after 45 years with department

Moellenberg started as a volunteer with what was then called the Pflugerville Volunteer Fire Department before he became chief of the Pflugerville Fire Department in 1986.

Austin, Travis County and Austin ISD officials gathered Sept. 24 to discuss local resilience planning. (Ben Thompson/Community Impact Newspaper)
Austin, Travis County, AISD look to build collaboration on community disaster hubs

The governments and school district are looking to grow a network of facilities that can provide resources to residents amid weather emergencies.

Two years after announcing it would build its new headquarters in Hutto, baseball scouting company Perfect Game moved the project to Cedar Park. (Courtesy Perfect Game)
Perfect Game to build new headquarters in Cedar Park, ending Hutto deal

Two years after announcing it would build its new headquarters in Hutto, baseball scouting company Perfect Game moved the project to Cedar Park.

Screen shot of Desmar Walkes speaking at a press conference
Austin Public Health eyes possible shift to Stage 4 guidelines

Local health leaders said they want to see the current downward trend of COVID-19 hospitalizations persist before making any changes.

James Avery Artisan Jewelry sells women’s and men’s jewelry designed in Kerrville, Texas. (Courtesy James Avery Artisan Jewelry)
James Avery Artisan Jewelry relocates Cedar Park store

The new store location held a grand opening Sept. 18.