Georgetown martial arts studio kicks off online class options

Matthew Bertling teaches a virtual class with his daughter Adryn. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)
Matthew Bertling teaches a virtual class with his daughter Adryn. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)

Matthew Bertling teaches a virtual class with his daughter Adryn. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)

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Matthew Bertling teaches a virtual class with his daughter Adryn. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)
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Adryn, Alexa and William Bertling teach an online class. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)
Image description
Adryn, Alexa and William Bertling teach an online class. (Courtesy Valor Martial Arts)

Class attendance at Valor Martial Arts Georgetown dropped 90% the week of March 16, owner Matthew Bertling said. The business stopped offering in-person classes March 18.

Virtual classes were launched March 23.


“Being blessed with very appreciative students, the reception of online classes was received well,” Bertling said. “On our first day we had somewhere between 90-115 students taking online classes.

The exact number is unknown because Facebook only shows views, he added.

Valor is using two different platforms to stream classes: Zoom allows interaction with students by name, and Facebook Live allows students to do the classes on their own timing.



Free beginner martial arts classes are offered for students who want to maintain skills while unable to physically attend class or who want to give the art a try. For a fee they can upgrade to programs that will include promotion to further belts along with more advanced movements and techniques to match their skill level, Bertling said. Students from other schools are also welcome.

The school is offering traditional martial arts classes in age specific groups, kickboxing, krav maga and jiujitsu.

“For our students that have stayed with us, we are offering more service in many different capacities,” he said. “We are letting them borrow our targets from our locations and giving them 15-minute private lessons through Zoom on a weekly basis.”

Bertling said he and wife, Alexa, believe sharing their knowledge throughout all channels during times like this will help develop a passion and love for martial arts as a vehicle that can help all people physically, mentally, socially and emotionally.

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By Sally Grace Holtgrieve

Sally Grace Holtgrieve solidified her passion for news during her time as Editor-in-Chief of Christopher Newport University's student newspaper, The Captain's Log. She started her professional career at The Virginia Gazette and moved to Texas in 2015 to cover government and politics at The Temple Daily Telegram. She started working at Community Impact Newspaper in February 2018 as the Lake Travis-Westlake reporter and moved into the role of Georgetown editor in June 2019.


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