Q&A: Meet the candidates for Conroe ISD board of trustees Position 7

Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, begins Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact staff)
Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, begins Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact staff)

Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, begins Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact staff)



HOUSTON



Conroe ISD board of trustees Position 7




*Indicates incumbent






Miesha Weaver




Occupation: oil and gas operations


Experience: vice president of PTO board; small-business owner; author






What are the main challenges now facing the district, and how do you plan to address them?



MW: COVID, as we all know, is the main challenge. I plan to work with our board and continue to improve safety measures, ensure the state is providing needed supplies and work to keep communication open and provide it at a time that allows them to plan ahead.



Why do you believe you would be a good voice to represent district residents on the board of trustees?



MW: I am a product of the CISD school district and a mother to children currently in the district. I have served in the community the past 10 years as a coach with the YMCA, a room mom, a CISD volunteer, a team mom on several youth programs and, currently, the [vice president] of programs for the PTO board at the local high school. As a woman, a mother, a parent of students in the district and a person of color, I bring the views of many others to the table from a different perspective.



If elected, are there any new projects or policies you would like to see introduced in the district? Are there any existing items you would like to see changed?



MW: It is my vision to see CISD further incorporate and expand skilled trade opportunities for our high school programs [and] ensure that just as we are building new facilities to accommodate our growing community that we also don’t forget about our older facilities—we need to ensure that they are equipped with the latest technology to keep them performing academically. I also want to take a look at our food vendors and get feedback on current food options for the students and possibly implement options that are being used and not wasted.



Do you feel the bond passed in 2019 will adequately address the district's needs, and when you do anticipate future bond elections might be considered?



MW: You can never foresee the future. [The] 2019 bond did not take in account of COVID and the schools being closed for majority of the year, virtual instruction [and] reduced capacity at extracurricular events. I have faith in our finance department and know that our budget has been well-maintained. This will have to be further looked at in 2021 when the state advises on public school funding for the year.









Scott Moore*




Occupation: clergy


Experience: Conroe ISD trustee; PTO president; Conroe High School football team chaplain






What are the main challenges now facing the district, and how do you plan to address them?



SM: The main issue facing the district today is our continuing response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the questions of how to best educate children while keeping them safe. This issue is evolving on a daily basis. I will continue to work with district administration to see that our communication remains effective and that our technology needs are met so that every student has the ability to learn in the environment that is best for him/her. I will also work with our district administration to ensure that online curriculum and education delivery is not subordinate in quality to in-person instruction.

I also believe that poverty is another huge issue facing our district. We have implemented new procedures to address our impoverished students and the difficulties we face. I will work to see that these programs remain viable and effective so that a child’s education does not suffer because of their family’s financial situation.



Why do you believe you would be a good voice to represent district residents on the board of trustees?



SM: I have already proven myself as a trustee willing to listen to the concerns of the citizens. During both of the bond referenda in 2019 and during the rezoning of schools in The Woodlands High School and College Park High School feeder zones, I took the time to meet with concerned citizens, to hear the issues that they felt were important and to represent those concerns to the board. I have also taken the time to attend meetings of parent groups addressing specific educational issues to learn more about the difficulties their students face. I have worked with these parents to improve conditions and accommodations for their children. Finally, I readily respond to communication from residents and have shown myself willing to engage in difficult conversations with citizens.



If elected, are there any new projects or policies you would like to see introduced in the district? Are there any existing items you would like to see changed?



SM: Over the summer months, I participated with Board President Datren Williams and Superintendent Dr. Curtis Null in a series of conversations around race relations in our community and how race and systemic racism affect our learning environment and the social-emotional well-being of our students. I would like to see that those conversations continue and that the recommendations we received continue to be considered and acted upon.


I will also continue to advocate for a moratorium on high-stakes standardized testing. This will involve direct advocacy with legislators and policy-makers at the state and federal levels.



Do you feel the bond passed in 2019 will adequately address the district's needs, and when you do anticipate future bond elections might be considered?



SM: I feel that the 2019 bond addressed most of the needs of the district which directly affect classroom education. If growth continues at the same historical rates, we will need to continue to build schools to address our growing student population. However, I do not feel another bond will be needed until at least 2023, possibly later. This board has a history of extending bonds further than originally anticipated and of finding creative ways to fund new projects. I would push the board to be creative in its administration and funding and to seek innovative ways to provide for the growing population without incurring undue debt and burdening the taxpayers. In recent years, the board has been able to “pay cash” for some schools outside of a bond referendum without incurring any debt. I will work with district officials to save money and to reallocate funds, if necessary, to avoid any unnecessary debt. If a bond did become necessary in 2023 or 2024, I would work diligently to ensure that it was possible to issue said bond without a corresponding increase in taxes.


By Ben Thompson
Ben joined Community Impact Newspaper in January 2019 and is a reporter for The Woodlands edition.


MOST RECENT

Houston City Hall in rainbow lighting
Greater Houston LGBT Chamber of Commerce celebrates five years of service

The organization is open to all and serves members throughout the Greater Houston area.

Montgomery County is set to receive its largest first-dose allocation during the week of March 1. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)
Montgomery County set to receive largest vaccine allocation yet in first week of March

Nearly 20,000 vaccine doses were allocated to the county's two vaccine hubs and several additional providers for the week of March 1.

A coronavirus vaccine is given at Memorial Hermann's mass vaccine clinic Feb. 26. (Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)
Memorial Hermann closes out 2nd round of vaccines with 7,000 distributed among 2 clinics

The clinic will continue operations through 5:30 p.m. Feb. 27.

The new Fort Bend Epicenter multipurpose facility could be used as a spot for trade shows and sporting events, could act as a large-scale shelter for county residents in an emergency and more. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Large multipurpose complex coming to Fort Bend County; Sugar Land to widen University Blvd. and more top Houston-area news

Read the top business and community news from the past week from the Houston area.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during a winter storm that hit Texas the night of Feb. 14. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
Legislators probe energy officials over power failures, lack of preparation heading into winter storm

The Texas Legislature held hearings Feb. 25 with energy companies including Oncor Electric Delivery and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas in response to last week’s historic winter storm, which left millions of Texans without electricity for days.

The Woodlands Township board of directors met Feb. 24 to discuss items including winter storm recovery and a financial report. (Screenshot via The Woodlands Township)
The Woodlands officials criticize county officials over CARES Act funds management; commissioner fires back

The Woodlands Township board of directors criticized Montgomery County's methods of allocating federal coronavirus aid at the board's Feb. 24 meeting, calling the $244,000 the township received a "slap in the face."

Keith Luechtefeld spoke with Community Impact Newspaper about some of the short-term and long-term repercussions of the storm as well as some of the reasons why so many homes saw burst pipes during the freezing weather. (Community Impact staff)
Q&A: Greater Houston Builders Association President Keith Luechtefeld discusses power, plumbing, frozen pipes after Winter Storm Uri

Keith Luechtefeld spoke with Community Impact Newspaper about some of the short-term and long-term repercussions of the storm as well as some of the reasons why so many homes saw burst pipes during the freezing weather.

Harris County ESD No. 11 commissioners met for a meeting Feb. 25. (Courtesy Cypress Creek EMS)
Harris County ESD No. 11 begins construction process on new facility

District offiicials have said they hope Phase 1 of construction will be complete by August.

Winter Storm Uri led to closures across the Greater Houston area during the third week of February. (Courtesy Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County)
‘It’s been a rough year for us’: Expert explains economic effects of winter storm, ongoing pandemic in Houston region

“It's been a rough year for us economically; it's been a rough year for us public health wise. It's just been a rough year for us psychologically—first the coronavirus and then the freeze," said Patrick Jankowski, senior vice president of research with the Greater Houston Partnership.

Gracie Barra The Woodlands relocated to a new training center on Richards Road earlier this year. (Courtesy Gracie Barra The Woodlands)
New cosmetic services, MMA gym: 5 recent business updates in The Woodlands and northern Spring

Several businesses have recently opened in or relocated into The Woodlands area.

In addition to produce, Theiss Farms offers grass-fed beef. The family’s herd of cattle grazes in a pasture near the intersection of Spring Cypress and Stuebner Airline roads. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)
Theiss Farms Market owner on winter storm: 'I knew everything was going to die, and it did'

Nothing could have prepared local farmers for last week's winter storm, Theiss Farms Market co-owner Dwayne Theiss said.