Butler’s Courtyard: Sisters carry on family legacy at historic wedding venue

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Butler’s Courtyard opened as a bank in 1909, but today the wedding venue stores treasures of a different kind.

A year ago owners Nancy and Ronnie Richards passed the building’s rich history onto their daughters, Amber Murphy and Shawna Erminger.

“We always knew it would be in our future,” Erminger said. “We invested as much time, love, sweat and tears as we could.”

Today, Butler’s Courtyard is an entire block made to host special events such as receptions, corporate gatherings and, of course, weddings.

The old bank is the main building, but there is also a barn, an outdoor tent, a gazebo popular for ceremonies and two houses for wedding parties. The land is full of photo opportunities for newlywed couples, Murphy said.

Murphy and Erminger recently opened a second location at an old fig factory a few blocks from the original venue, which will allow the business to host two events simultaneously.

“It’s only been one year, and we’re already doubling the business, so that’s pretty good,” Murphy said.

While Nancy has retired, Ronnie now works for his daughters. Working with one’s family has its pros and cons, the owners said.

There is a great sense of trust among the family members, so none of them worry when leaving responsibilities to each other, Murphy said.

A downside is the sisters sometimes miss out on family events with each other because one of them has to work.

Both women hope their children one day take over the business so that the family legacy can live on through Butler’s Courtyard for generations.

“It’s the best job in the world, I think,” Murphy said. “Our heart and soul is here.”

Butler’s Courtyard

122 N. Michigan Ave., League City

281-557-5551

www.butlerscourtyard.com

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Jake Magee
Jake Magee has been a print journalist for a few years, covering topics such as city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be an editor with Community Impact. In his free time, Magee enjoys playing video games, jamming on the drums and bass, longboarding and petting his cat.
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