Survey: Residents have positive perception of League City

(Courtesy city of League City)
(Courtesy city of League City)

(Courtesy city of League City)

According to the first randomly sampled survey done in League City in nearly a decade, residents have an above-average perception of the city compared to state and national averages.

Dawn Davis of ETC Institute, which conducts community surveys across the country, said during a League City City Council meeting Jan. 14 that residents rated the city at or above U.S. averages in 70 of 79 areas that were measured, including quality of life, leadership of elected officials and satisfaction with city services. Overall, League City residents’ overall satisfaction with city services is among the highest in the nation, she said.

About 91% of respondents said they are satisfied living in League City, and only 2% said they were dissatisfied. About 76% of respondents said they feel they are getting their tax dollars’ worth living in the city compared to 24% who said they are not, according to the survey.

One area in which the city scored below state and national averages was traffic. On average in the U.S., about 51% of survey respondents are satisfied with the overall flow of traffic and congestion management in their cities, and the average for the state is 48%. In League City, the satisfaction rate is 32%, Davis said.

Davis said it makes sense that residents are experiencing traffic issues in an area that is growing as quickly as League City.


Respondents listed improving traffic congestion as the highest priority for the city compared to preparing for emergencies, enforcing local codes and ordinances, having quality trash and recycling services, and more, according to the survey.

For public works services, respondents said again the highest priority should be managing traffic flow, improving water drainage and quickly finishing road repairs.

Additionally, respondents listed the number of hiking trails in League City as the highest priority among parks, recreation and library services. Meanwhile, the quality of library services was one of the lowest-rated priorities for respondents. League City officials are considering what should be done to improve Helen Hall Library, which consultants have said is far too small for the city’s population and recently experienced water damage.

Council Member Andy Mann said he was impressed by the results of the survey, which was distributed to over 400 randomly selected residents of different demographics and areas of residency within the city.

“By and far, I was amazed at how well we did,” he said.

Mayor Pat Hallisey agreed, saying that city officials like to think things are going well despite tending to hear more about problems than successes within the city.

“We tend to hear about everything that’s wrong. That’s what we get bombarded with,” he said.

City Manager John Baumgartner said the survey results are a testament to the investments the city makes in the community. The responses related to traffic concerns are not taken lightly, and the city is working to address the problems, he said.
By Jake Magee
Jake Magee has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper.

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