Meet the candidates running for US House of Representatives District 14

Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, began Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, began Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Early voting for the November election, when voters will choose candidates for national, state and local positions, began Oct. 13. Election Day is Nov. 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)



HOUSTON



U.S. House of Representatives District 14






*indicates incumbent





Adrienne Bell



D



Occupation: Fourth grade teacher


Experience: Worked with Organizing For America during the Obama campaign and played an important part of the grassroots team that led to his re-election; worked as deputy field director with Battleground Texas training volunteers and expanding the voter electorate in the Houston/Gulf Coast area.






What would you prioritize if elected to help constituents both protect themselves from COVID-19 and recover from the pandemic's economic effects?



AB: At the baseline, I believe in science. I trust scientists to find the answers we seek, and they’ve already provided us the basics—wearing masks, socially distancing ourselves, not gathering in large groups—these are all things that have been proven to prevent the spread of COVID. I am constantly amazed at the irony of the GOP’s insistence on denying the veracity of science by posting nonsense conspiracy theories on the Internet, a product of science. I would work to develop a set of guidelines that would protect employers and employees to keep them safe, and then push Congress for a real stimulus package so that those who need to can afford to stay home. Ignoring science and pushing schools and the state to reopen when we are nowhere near being clear of COVID is reckless.



In light of recent social justice movements, what can U.S. representatives do to ensure their constituents from all backgrounds have equitable access to the resources they need for success?



AB: We need to end our war on the working class. Millions lack healthcare, while the Federal government seems to be doing everything it can to thwart that goal. Small businesses, our mom and pops, are the backbone of the economy, and to survive, they need customers and a bridge to deliver them into a post-COVID era. Moreover, we must renew the Civil Rights Act, with an eye toward the challenges laid bare by 2020. We must also renew the Violence Against Women Act, which Weber voted against. Our marginalized communities are waiting for the federal government to recognize they even exist, but I am here to say “I see you, and I am here to help.”


What do you bring to the table that Weber does not?



AB: For one thing, I am present and care about the people of Texas. When it comes to the people of the district, Weber is a no show. I talk with many people across this district who have never heard of Weber, even though he has been in office nearly a decade. In Brazoria, the people are suffering from a water crisis with a brain eating amoeba in the groundwater. I delivered drinking water to the district over the [weekend of Sept. 26]. I care about you and your family. You deserve representation in Congress by someone who is not bought by big money, nor special interests.









Randy Weber*



R



Occupation: member of the U.S. House of Representatives since 2013


Experience: holds leadership role on the Science, Space, and Technology committee, serving as the ranking member of the Energy subcommittee; a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, where he serves on the following subcommittees: Water Resources and Environment; Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation; Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials





This candidate did not respond to requests for comment.

By Colleen Ferguson
A native central New Yorker, Colleen Ferguson worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. Colleen graduated from Syracuse University in 2019, where she worked for the campus's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange, with a degree in Newspaper and Online Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and a degree in Spanish language and culture. Colleen previously interned with The Journal News/lohud, where she covered the commute in the greater New York City area.

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