November 2020 election: Clear Lake Shores City Council candidate Q&A



CLEAR LAKE SHORES



City Council at-large positions










Randy Chronister




Occupation: Owner of The Air Affair A/C and Heating


Experience: Business owner since 1993, Clear lake Shores resident since 1997






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



RC: One of the most important issues facing Clear lake Shores is budgeting. Our city revenue comes primarily from sales tax, and it takes proper planning and budgeting to address needs of the city.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



RC: I believe that it is a priority for Clear Lake Shores to support the Economic Development Committee in the development and growth of our commercial businesses in order to increase our city’s income.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



RC: I have lived in Clear lake Shores since 1997, and have formed many relationships with the citizens of Clear Lake Shores through business and friendships. I believe those relationships will help me make tough decisions that may come in front of our city council.RC









Rick Fisher




Occupation: Airline pilot


Experience: My wife, Sam (Samantha) moved to Clear Lake Shores in 2010, so we have lived here for 10 years, but I have been coming down to the area since I was in elementary school as my dad always had (& still has) a boat in the Watergate/Waterford marina. As kids, we loved going by Clear Lake Shores while motoring our to the bay for a sail & seeing everyone driving around on golfcarts. Even back then, I thought this would be a great place to live.






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



RF: What I would like to see is more personal interaction between city leaders and citizens. As an elected official, I want to make sure that the people I will represent have their voices heard on decisions made for their city and community.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



RF: My other priory is to keep Clear Lake Shores a safe and viable city. One of the biggest draws to this city for people, ourselves included, is the sense of community and that peaceful feeling of serenity we all get every time we drive across that bridge into the neighborhood. That is what makes this a wonderful place to live & I want to make sure it stays that way.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



RF: I think any of the candidates running would be a fine choice for our community but what I will bring to the table is what we are trained to do on the job, which is to make decisions based on all available resources and information. And one of the greatest resources will be the neighbors I will be representing if I am elected.









Daniel Otto




Occupation: Retired


Experience: 20+ years in Corporate Governance and Ethics






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



DO: Otto is running for City Council to bring transparency and sustainability to City Council actions. Transparency includes independence and objectivity in all actions with clear communication all along the governmental process. Sustainability includes determining environmental, economic and social factors in making decisions based on current and future needs of the community.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



DO: Promote new businesses to increase the tax base of the city.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



DO: I have 5 certifications which support my belief in ethics and accountability. CPA, CIA, CFE, PMP and CRMA. I have 20+ years experience in managing people, processes, budgets and projects.









Elliott Rittershaus




Occupation: Student at the University of Houston (BS in Supply Chain Management. Currently interning at a heavy equipment rental company.)


Experience: Although I have not had any political experience, I have had the opportunity to participate in various areas of my university’s community.






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



ER: I want to increase economic development for the purpose of upgrading and maintaining the community spaces, for example: the two parks on the island and the children’s playground area. Community involvement and togetherness is important among many residents in Clear Lake Shores. I aim to improve transparency between the council and community members, to allow residents to have a voice in their community. As councilman it is most important that I represent my constituents’ interests in the best way possible.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



ER: A checks and balance system is something the community desperately needs. Many residents have expressed frustration at the way their tax revenue is being used on island projects. I want to create a stronger communication channel between the residents and council members in order to dispel the feeling that residents do not have a voice in local affairs.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



ER: I find that my age is something that is most important when considering me as a viable candidate. I can bring fresh new ideas to the community as I have a different outlook on the world. As someone who has had the opportunity to live all over the world, I have had influential experiences that have shaped my world views and I intend to bring my skills to the community in order to create a stronger Clear Lake Shores. My dependability and trustworthiness are character traits that would benefit the community greatly.ER









William Alex Scanlon




Occupation: Professional Engineer


Experience: I have served on the Clear Lake Shores ZBOA (Variance Board) since 2016 and the Roads and Drainage Committee since 2017.






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



WS: The most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores is the projected growth and changes to our City's infrastructure including the Town Center, Hwy. 146 expansion, and increasing population density. Navigating these changes while preserving the island lifestyle we all love through this period is paramount to the success of our community. I would support and make proactive decisions to encourage and shape new roads, construction, and businesses along our commercial corridors while being a staunch defender of our residential area against increases in through traffic, noise, and the possibility of a city tax.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



WS: I am a big supporter of maintaining and improving the unique elements of our community including our abundance of trees, parks and gathering venues along with preserving golf cart and waterfront accessibility. Preventing pollution and other environmental threats is also important to me. Other priorities of mine include assuring city budget and resource allocation in the city are appropriate and in the best interest of our citizens' quality of life.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



WS: I am a licensed Professional Engineer with experience in mechanical and civil projects both public and private. I regularly engineer projects on the island giving me a unique perspective and understanding of our city’s strengths and weaknesses regarding building codes and regulations. I believe my combined technical experience and familiarity with our city would allow me to make well informed decisions, and more importantly ask the correct questions to ensure council is well informed to make decisions that protect our residents’ interests and lifestyles.









Steve Wirtes




Occupation: Petrochemical Industry Account Manager


Experience: Member of Clear Lake Shores Planning & Zoning Committee since 2016






What is the most important issue facing Clear Lake Shores, and how would you address it as a council member?



SW: The most important issue facing our city is governing in a responsible manner. I will support measures to encourage the growth of present and future businesses to our unique island community. Having successful business directly correlates to the Clear Lake Shores having the financial resources available to maintain the safety, quality of life to its citizens, and strong property values.



What other priorities would you have as a council member?



SW: We are the “Yachting Capital of Texas” and most, if not all of us, were drawn to our community for the desire to be close to the water. As a member of city council, I would continue to encourage activities and welcome new businesses which are consistent with our family-friendly environment, as well as to monitor city expenditures to ensure responsible spending.


What do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?



SW: The individuals on the ballot are both my neighbors and fine people. Many of us “islanders” are fiercely independent, but we pull together during times of crisis such as past hurricane events. That said, I have not answered your question. Perhaps having been a resident since 1999, I have a different perspective—one that remembers the “good old days” which attracted me initially. Likewise, I have had the opportunity to witness our community blossom. As one of my neighbors succinctly stated, “All cares in the world disappear the moment I drive over the bridge into Clear Lake Shores!”


By Jake Magee
Jake Magee has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper.

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