League City creates task force, Seabrook creates fund to respond to economic impacts of coronavirus

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)
League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott.

The group, which includes local business and city leaders, will develop a plan to help League City economically recover from the aftermath of the coronavirus outbreak. The task force will specifically help the business owners and residents hit hardest by the pandemic, according to a city news release.

“The idea is to help as many people in the community as possible,” said Economic Development Director Scott Livingston, a member of the task force. “So, we’re talking about citizens; we’re talking about business; we’re talking about anybody and everybody who’s a stakeholder in the community.”

The group will compile an internet database of resources available during the outbreak. The resources will includes everything from mental and physical health to financial assistance to employment information and more, according to the release.

Task force members include real estate agent James Brockway; Dewan Clayborn, CEO of League City Regional Chamber of Commerce; Paul Clines, pastor of Bay Harbour United Methodist Church; Red River BBQ owner Kevin Kiersh; Ashlea Quinonez, Memorial Hermann Health System community relations director; and more.


The group’s first meeting is this week.

Meanwhile, the Seabrook Economic Development Corporation is inviting Seabrook businesses affected by the andemic to apply for the Seabrook Emergency Business Retention Incentive. Businesses that qualify may receive an incentive between $3,500 to $10,000 depending on several criteria, including the business size and number of employees, type of business and other factors, according to a city news release.

A total of $250,000 is available for the local incentives. Each business who receives some of the money must use it for lease payments, utilities, payroll and other expenses besides business owner salaries, the release reads.

Seabrook business owners who wish to apply must do so by April 29 at www.seabrooktx.gov/emergency-incentive. For more information, contact Seabrook Economic Development Director Paul Chavez at [email protected] or 281-291-5730.
By Jake Magee

Editor, Bay Area & Pearland/Friendswood

Jake has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper. Today, he covers everything from aerospace to transportation to flood mitigation.