League City creates task force, Seabrook creates fund to respond to economic impacts of coronavirus

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)
League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott. (Courtesy city of League City)

League City City Council at its April 14 meeting voted to create an emergency turnaround task force to supplement Texas’s slow reopening of businesses, which was announced April 17 by Gov. Greg Abbott.

The group, which includes local business and city leaders, will develop a plan to help League City economically recover from the aftermath of the coronavirus outbreak. The task force will specifically help the business owners and residents hit hardest by the pandemic, according to a city news release.

“The idea is to help as many people in the community as possible,” said Economic Development Director Scott Livingston, a member of the task force. “So, we’re talking about citizens; we’re talking about business; we’re talking about anybody and everybody who’s a stakeholder in the community.”

The group will compile an internet database of resources available during the outbreak. The resources will includes everything from mental and physical health to financial assistance to employment information and more, according to the release.

Task force members include real estate agent James Brockway; Dewan Clayborn, CEO of League City Regional Chamber of Commerce; Paul Clines, pastor of Bay Harbour United Methodist Church; Red River BBQ owner Kevin Kiersh; Ashlea Quinonez, Memorial Hermann Health System community relations director; and more.


The group’s first meeting is this week.

Meanwhile, the Seabrook Economic Development Corporation is inviting Seabrook businesses affected by the andemic to apply for the Seabrook Emergency Business Retention Incentive. Businesses that qualify may receive an incentive between $3,500 to $10,000 depending on several criteria, including the business size and number of employees, type of business and other factors, according to a city news release.

A total of $250,000 is available for the local incentives. Each business who receives some of the money must use it for lease payments, utilities, payroll and other expenses besides business owner salaries, the release reads.

Seabrook business owners who wish to apply must do so by April 29 at www.seabrooktx.gov/emergency-incentive. For more information, contact Seabrook Economic Development Director Paul Chavez at pchavez@seabrooktx.gov or 281-291-5730.
By Jake Magee
Jake Magee has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper.

<

MOST RECENT

District officials shared storm damage photos at a Feb. 22 board meeting. (Courtesy Clear Creek ISD)
Clear Creek ISD updates: 88% of campuses sustained damage during winter storm, quarantine practices revised

District safety officials briefed trustees at a board meeting Feb. 22 about the extent of damages and gave other details related to CCISD’s storm responses. Of the 42 campuses, 37 sustained damages requiring immediate action, officials said.

key in door lock
Evictions continue in Houston as new measures aim to stem tide

Over 32,000 eviction cases were filed in Harris County courts in 2020.

Houston City Hall in rainbow lighting
Greater Houston LGBT Chamber of Commerce celebrates five years of service

The organization is open to all and serves members throughout the Greater Houston area.

Reedy Chapel, one of more than a dozen historically Black churches in Galveston, is a stop on the tour. (Courtesy Clayton Kolavo/GICVB Marketing)
Galveston tourism app guides visitors through city’s historically Black institutions, monuments

The interactive app, offered by the Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau, allows visitors to customize a tour itinerary based on interests and time allocation.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during a winter storm that hit Texas the night of Feb. 14. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
Legislators probe energy officials over power failures, lack of preparation heading into winter storm

The Texas Legislature held hearings Feb. 25 with energy companies including Oncor Electric Delivery and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas in response to last week’s historic winter storm, which left millions of Texans without electricity for days.

Keith Luechtefeld spoke with Community Impact Newspaper about some of the short-term and long-term repercussions of the storm as well as some of the reasons why so many homes saw burst pipes during the freezing weather. (Community Impact staff)
Q&A: Greater Houston Builders Association President Keith Luechtefeld discusses power, plumbing, frozen pipes after Winter Storm Uri

Keith Luechtefeld spoke with Community Impact Newspaper about some of the short-term and long-term repercussions of the storm as well as some of the reasons why so many homes saw burst pipes during the freezing weather.

Winter Storm Uri led to closures across the Greater Houston area during the third week of February. (Courtesy Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County)
‘It’s been a rough year for us’: Expert explains economic effects of winter storm, ongoing pandemic in Houston region

“It's been a rough year for us economically; it's been a rough year for us public health wise. It's just been a rough year for us psychologically—first the coronavirus and then the freeze," said Patrick Jankowski, senior vice president of research with the Greater Houston Partnership.

The $560 million central processor, which is part of the new Mickey Leland International Terminal, will replace the parking garage for terminals D and E. (Courtesy Houston Airport System)
Parking garage at George Bush Intercontinental Airport to be demolished to make way for new Mickey Leland International Terminal

The international central processor, which is part of the new Mickey Leland International Terminal, will replace the parking garage for terminals D and E.

As many as 31 stores across nine states will be shuttered as Fry's Electronics shuts down due to market changes and the pandemic. (Courtesy Qygen, Wikimedia Commons)
Fry's Electronics calls it quits after nearly 36 years in business

As many as 31 stores across nine states will be shuttered as Fry's Electronics shuts down due to market changes and the pandemic.

A lone runner jogs on a snow-covered road in Austin. Transportation projects across the city were briefly paused due to Winter Storm Uri. (Jack Flagler/Community Impact Newspaper)
ERCOT: Texas power system was less than 5 minutes from collapse during winter storm

ERCOT's CEO offered details into what led to the massive blackouts that left millions of Texans in the cold last week.

Emerging technology and alternative energy sectors could help ease the blow of an oil and gas industry downturn in Houston caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, a Houston-area economist said. (Courtesy Visit Houston)
Greater Houston area could see economic relief from pandemic around mid-2021, economist says

Emerging technology and alternative-energy sectors could help ease the blow of the downturn in Houston's oil and gas industry caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.