12 League City employees test positive for coronavirus

Twelve League City employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, the city unveiled April 14. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Twelve League City employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, the city unveiled April 14. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Twelve League City employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, the city unveiled April 14. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

Twelve League City employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, the city unveiled April 14.

An EMS worker tested positive April 14. The other victims include seven fire marshal's office employees and four League City police officers, Sarah Greer Osborne, director of communications and media relations, told Community Impact Newspaper.

Assistant Chief Tommy Cones was one of the seven fire marshal's office employees to contract the virus. He said it was the worst illness he has endured, Mayor Pat Hallisey said at the April 14 League City City Council meeting.

Cones and many other League City employees have since recovered and returned to work, Hallisey and Osborne said.

Additionally, a volunteer firefighter for the League City Fire Department is in critical condition with the illness, Hallisey said. The firefighter, a male, has a pre-existing condition and has been in the hospital since last week, Osborne said.


The last count, unveiled April 6, revealed a total of 11 city employees had contracted the coronavirus. On April 1, the city unveiled 10 had tested positive for coronavirus. The count on March 30 was eight.
By Jake Magee

Editor, Bay Area & Pearland/Friendswood

Jake has been a print journalist for several years, covering numerous beats including city government, education, business and more. Starting off at a daily newspaper in southern Wisconsin, Magee covered two small cities before being promoted to covering city government in the heart of newspaper's coverage area. He moved to Houston in mid-2018 to be the editor for and launch the Bay Area edition of Community Impact Newspaper. Today, he covers everything from aerospace to transportation to flood mitigation.