Paradise Tropical Wines: Wine bar, boutique brings Florida fruit flavors to Kemah

The watermelon tropical explosion ($9), which consists of watermelon wine with a watermelon cotton candy glitter bomb, is one of the wine bar's most popular items. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)
The watermelon tropical explosion ($9), which consists of watermelon wine with a watermelon cotton candy glitter bomb, is one of the wine bar's most popular items. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)

The watermelon tropical explosion ($9), which consists of watermelon wine with a watermelon cotton candy glitter bomb, is one of the wine bar's most popular items. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Colton Trout (right) bought the business from its previous owners in December 2019. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)
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The beer sold at Paradise comes from Kansas City-based Boulevard Brewing Company, which Trout said was chosen for its unique beverage varieties. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Trout sells alcohol-infused rum cakes, which he makes himself, at Paradise in addition to the wine, beer and wine smoothies. (Courtesy of Colton Trout)
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The outdoor space at Paradise has been revamped to accommodate both live performance and lounging. (Colleen Ferguson/Community Impact Newspaper)
Colton Trout tells customers four cardinal rules when they come into his store and choose wines to taste: You will like the wine if you like the fruit; you will not like the wine if you do not like the fruit; you will be allergic to the wine if you are allergic to the fruit; and, finally, no apologies are necessary if you do not like the wine you try.

“No apologies, not in paradise,” Trout said. “Your palette likes what your palette likes.”

Locals and visitors to Kemah can sample more than three dozen different wines, sparkling wines and wine smoothies at the wine bar and boutique, located at 603 Bradford Ave., Ste. B. Varieties range from stone fruit and tropical flavors to berry and citrus, as well as several specialty and sparkling types.

Regulars can join a wino club for $20 monthly, where they receive 10% off all drinks and one free bottle of wine a month picked up in-store. Other deals include 5% off six bottles of wine and 10% off, plus a free bottle, with the purchase of a dozen.

Trout gets new shipments about once every two weeks to keep up with demand. No one flavor stands out in terms of popularity because people have such a variety of tastes, he said.


“I can’t keep any of them stocked,” he said of the various flavors, which even include a tomato-flavored wine reminiscent of a Bloody Mary cocktail.

Trout, 23, bought the business from its previous owners in December 2019 and gave new life to the wine bar part of the store, extending weekend hours and revamping the outdoor space for guest use. Wine accessories and other items are available for purchase around the shop, which Trout said is located inside a protected historical building. In the future, he hopes to host LGBT nights, karaoke nights and live musicians.

With heated seating outdoors and several stools indoors, the location provides boardwalk-goers with a quieter spot to talk and have a drink. In an effort to support local restaurateurs, Trout will occasionally bring food trucks to the wine bar, and guests are encouraged to bring their own meals. He also makes his own rum cakes, which are sold at Paradise as well.

Two wine and beer samples, or one wine smoothie sample, per person are complimentary, and additional tastings cost $0.50 to $1 for beer and wine, respectively. The beer comes from Kansas City-based Boulevard Brewing Company, which Trout said was chosen for its unique beverage varieties. Wine can be ordered by the glass, flight or bottle, and can be taken to-go.

Paradise could not offer sampling, but was not required to close, during COVID-19 shutdowns. Trout, who does virtually all of the work for the business himself, said the pandemic spurred change and creativity as he looked for ways to attract customers.

“This year, entrepreneurs had to learn how to pivot their businesses,” he said. “We had to get really creative... Pretty much everything that we did had to be different.”
By Colleen Ferguson
A native central New Yorker, Colleen Ferguson worked as an editorial intern with the Cy-Fair and Lake Houston | Humble | Kingwood editions of Community Impact before joining the Bay Area team in 2020. Colleen graduated from Syracuse University in 2019, where she worked for the campus's independent student newspaper The Daily Orange, with a degree in Newspaper and Online Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and a degree in Spanish language and culture. Colleen previously interned with The Journal News/lohud, where she covered the commute in the greater New York City area.

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