'Enough is enough': Richardson bar owner refuses to close despite statewide mandate

Six Springs Tavern is a live music club, bar and restaurant in Richardson. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)
Six Springs Tavern is a live music club, bar and restaurant in Richardson. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Six Springs Tavern is a live music club, bar and restaurant in Richardson. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

Six Springs Tavern in Richardson has made it clear it will remain open despite the governor's statewide order calling for bars to close.

Owner Brad Springs said his business should not be punished for the failure of others to follow safety protocols.

“We are not going to be held responsible for other people's bad behavior,” Springs said. “We are not doing anything worse than what happens in a restaurant.”

Live acts that were scheduled to perform June 26 at Six Springs will continue as planned, Springs announced via Facebook.



Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order June 26 that requires certain Texas bars to close by noon. Businesses that receive more than 51% of their revenue from alcohol sales are subject to the order, which also calls for restaurants to return to 50% capacity by 12:01 a.m. June 29.

“At this time, it is clear that the rise in cases is largely driven by certain types of activities, including Texans congregating in bars,” Abbott said in a June 26 news release. “The actions in this executive order are essential to our mission to swiftly contain this virus and protect public health.”

Six Springs Tavern is a live music club that houses a full kitchen and should therefore not be lumped in with bars that only serve alcohol, Springs said.

“We do serve food just like restaurants do, but, technically, we are a bar and we can’t open,” Springs said. “It just makes no sense.”

The business was closed for three and a half months during the pandemic, Springs said. The loss of revenue forced Springs to lay off a majority of his staff.

“The light bill still has to be paid, the rent still has to be paid,” Springs said. “With zero income how do you do that? It has set us back tremendously.”

Despite his firm stance, Springs said he is concerned about the possible repercussions of remaining open. Businesses that do not comply are subject to a fine of no more than $1,000, according to Abbott’s order.

“We obviously don't want to get hit with fines and and take any heat on that, but at some point you just have to say enough is enough,” he said.

The bar will continue to follow safety and sanitation guidelines and operate at 50% capacity, he added.

“Throughout [the pandemic] we have been in compliance,” Springs said. “We still intend to do that.”