Despite a global pandemic, these 4 Dallas-Fort Worth businesses are positioned to grow

Certain companies, such as Fujitsu in Richardson, have responded to the crisis by improving wireless networks so that businesses can work remotely. (Courtesy Fujitsu)
Certain companies, such as Fujitsu in Richardson, have responded to the crisis by improving wireless networks so that businesses can work remotely. (Courtesy Fujitsu)

Certain companies, such as Fujitsu in Richardson, have responded to the crisis by improving wireless networks so that businesses can work remotely. (Courtesy Fujitsu)

The coronavirus pandemic has rattled industries across the globe, but certain businesses have positioned themselves to emerge stronger than before.

A May 20 webinar hosted by the Richardson Chamber of Commerce highlighted companies that quickly adapted to the changing environment and will likely be in high demand once the crisis is over.

Fujitsu

Fujitsu, which has a regional hub in Richardson, offers products and services that scale wireless networks to meet demand and allow mobility, according to Richard Colter, the company’s director of network strategic planning.

“We are seeing a 20%-25% increase in bandwidth across the network as a result of cloud computing and streaming video,” Colter said. “That really drives a need for products we build and manufacture in Richardson and is a long-term trend we are excited about.”


Cisco Systems

During the crisis, Cisco Systems committed to enabling its products for use by front-line workers, such as doctors and nurses.

The company has developed desktops, tablets and other devices with an integrated teleconference software called Webex. In February, Webex meeting minutes totaled 6.7 billion. That number increased to 14.3 billion minutes in March, and in April, time spent on Webex meetings nearly doubled to 24.7 billion minutes, Reeder said.

The technology has helped overburdened health care facilities conduct medical appointments remotely, said John Reeder, senior director of product management.

“It was really very effective, and the amount of time we took to be able to set these up was critical to keeping the hospitals going,” he said.

Jacobs Engineering

Dallas-based Jacobs Engineering offers technical, professional and construction services. The company is currently overseeing the architectural and engineering aspects of the Silver Line, the latest addition to Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s light-rail system. The Silver Line will include two stops in Richardson.

Lisa Chill, director of interior solutions for the company’s south region, said the pandemic has led her colleagues and clients to ponder what workplaces of the future might look like. Services provided by Jacobs could help reconfigure space used by schools, businesses and hospitals post-coronavirus.

Jacobs also worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to set up temporary emergency rooms and triage units for doctors and nurses treating patients with the virus.

“What we did is we worked with many different health care systems across the country to immediately set up units to help manage the COVID crisis,” she said.

eMDs

The coronavirus has created a “big opportunity for change in how patients see physicians,” said Neil Simon, COO of eMDs, a Richardson-based company that develops electronic health records and practice management software. The pandemic has led the company to augment its systems with telehealth capabilities to help customers cope with managing their patient populations more effectively.

The company has now turned its focus to simplifying its products so they can be used by both the “technologically literate and illiterate,” Simon said.

“How can we make virtual meetings as simple as picking up a telephone and making a call?” he said.

An overburdened health care system means chronic conditions may have gone untreated over the past couple of months, Simon said. Once the pandemic situation improves, doctors will need as many avenues as possible to treat patients. He said he predicts the future of the industry will include a combination of both office and virtual visits.

“We will have a new normal that we all get used to,” he said. “It won’t be exactly what it was before, but I don’t believe what we have today is what it is going to be forever.”

Editor's note: This story has been amended to include more information about eMDs.
By Olivia Lueckemeyer
Olivia Lueckemeyer graduated in 2013 from Loyola University New Orleans with a degree in journalism. She joined Community Impact Newspaper in October 2016 as reporter for the Southwest Austin edition before her promotion to editor in March 2017. In July 2018 she returned home to the Dallas area and became editor of the Richardson edition.


MOST RECENT

Commissioners on Nov. 22 voted to approve a density change to preliminary plans for The Preserve, a neighborhood that city documents said could include 565 single-family homes at the northeast corner of Teel and Panther Creek Parkways. (Courtesy city of Frisco)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Neighborhood near PGA Frisco could see larger lots; ERCOT says Texas power grid ready for expected winter demand and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 24.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott sits beside Samsung CEO Dr. Kinam Kim as he announces the company is brining a $17 billion facility to Taylor. (Screnshot via KXAN)
Samsung makes it official: Announcement from Governor's Mansion confirms $17B facility coming to Taylor

Nearly a year after Williamson County officials began pitching Samsung to bring a megafacility to the area, the electronics giant has made it official.

Bill Curci is a chief operating partner for Shuck Me, a seafood restaurant in Fort Worth. (Bailey Lewis/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Fort Worth restaurant Shuck Me is fishing- and family-centric; a guide to Houston's 2021 Thanksgiving Day Parade and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 23.

Dobie Pre-Kindergarten School students Jariel Sanchez (foreground) and Javier Santacruz Ordonez work on tablets as part of the Pre-K for All program. (Courtesy Richardson ISD)
Growing pre-K program aims to serve more Richardson ISD students

Richardson ISD’s Pre-K for All program is the foundation for all of the district’s academic offerings, according to Superintendent Jeannie Stone.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during Winter Storm Uri in February. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
ERCOT: Texas power grid ready for expected winter demand

The state's electric grid manager also said extreme weather could once again result in outages.

Jordan Tomenga as Scrooge
Family-run Repertory Company Theatre brings 35 years of performances to Richardson

The troupe-driven, nonprofit operation hosts annual productions ranging from classics to new Broadway hits.

Cable television jewelry channel Shop LC will relocate its headquarters to Cedar Park with a $50 million capital investment. (Courtesy city of Cedar Park)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Shopping network moving headquarters to Cedar Park; affordable housing projects come online in McKinney and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 22.

Dallas Area Rapid Transit is updating around 10,000 bus stop signs as part of its bus network overhaul that will go into effect Jan. 24. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)
Dallas Area Rapid Transit works to update 10K signs as part of bus network overhaul

Riders in Plano and Richardson will see revisions to a number of the cities' routes and services.

Photo of a Moderna vaccine vial
FDA, CDC expand Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine booster authorizations to all adults

Booster shots could be available to all adults ahead of the holiday season.

Kirby Ice House will build a location on over 4 acres in The Woodlands Town Center. (Courtesy Howard Hughes Corpp.)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: US 183 North construction to begin early 2022; Houston-based Kirby Ice House planning location in The Woodlands and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 19.