Election Q&A: Two candidates enter runoff for Plano City Council Place 4

Learn more about the runoff candidates for Plano City Council Place 4. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Learn more about the runoff candidates for Plano City Council Place 4. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Learn more about the runoff candidates for Plano City Council Place 4. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Image description
Image description
On June 5, Plano voters can head to the polls to cast a ballot in a runoff election for City Council's Place 4 seat.

In the May 1 election, no candidate received at least 50% of the votes, so the candidates with the two highest vote totals will proceed to the runoff election. Early voting will be May 24-June 1.

Editor’s note: An asterisk(*) indicates the candidate is an incumbent. Candidates are listed in alphabetical order by last name.


DALLAS-FORT WORTH



Plano City Council Place 4










Justin Adcock



Occupation: client manager, Alacrity Solutions








Why are you running for Plano City Council?



JA: I see ways that council members can make a difference in Plano, and I want to do my part to bring about those positive changes to our community. I want to restore trust in our city government, through transparency and accountability. In a time of divisive rhetoric, I want to stop the name-calling and focus on policies that benefit our suburban lifestyle and thriving business environment.



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



JA: I manage a $100 million account with a Fortune 100 company, overseeing a team of 300 people in 30 states. This involves budgeting, planning, quality assurance, and customer relations.

For the past 10 years, my wife and I have also owned a small business in Plano that deals in manufacturing parts and equipment. This involves negotiating, accounting, and strategizing for future growth.

While these qualifications give me the knowledge and skills to effectively oversee city government, I feel my ability to listen, empathize, and relate to people are just as important for successfully representing citizens as their council member. I commit to listening to each issue with an open mind and making decisions based on what is best for the future of Plano.



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



JA: 1. Stop high-density development around Plano which adds to traffic congestion, lower property values, and [prevent high class] sizes [in schools].


2. Continue to implement the effective tax rate to keep homeowner property taxes from rising.

3. Maintain the lifestyle amenities like parks and libraries that our residents love and value and fully support our excellent first responders.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



JA: Our roads and infrastructure were not built to accommodate our current population. The explosion of high-density developments has put a tremendous burden on our roads that is way past their capacity. While there are some measures which must be taken to mitigate these detrimental consequences, we must pause any further high-density developments, until traffic studies and long-term solutions can be achieved.

Public transportation is not feasible in the vast majority of the city, so having a car is necessary to get around. Therefore, our budget must focus on providing high-quality and safe roads for our residents and first responders.

Workplaces are adjusting to a post-COVID world so we should review our current plan for growth and development and make sure we are utilizing city resources effectively.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



JA: Plano citizens have continually stated they favor smaller patio-style homes, rather than high-density housing. Many senior residents would love to downsize but have no options. By allowing for these smaller homes, it will free up the larger residences in neighborhoods for new families. These families will renovate and spend money in the community, further helping our economy. I believe in reinvigorating our neighborhoods—not overwhelming them.

Plano continually attracts the best companies from around the nation due to our business-friendly nature, neighborhoods and lifestyle amenities. We should continue to attract these businesses and focus on providing quality jobs and opportunities for our residents.

I will support planning and zoning that encourages land use for smaller homes or new business. We have enough high-density residential developments, so more [are] not needed or beneficial to our community.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



JA: I’m a husband and a father of four great kids. Two are currently in PISD schools, and the other two are soon to be enrolled as well. We attend Prestonwood Baptist Church, where I taught my son’s Sunday school class and coached my daughter’s soccer team through Prestonwood Sports Organization. We have a dog, Bear, that we enjoy taking to Plano’s many parks. We love living in Plano, and want to keep it one of the best cities to raise a family!









Kayci Prince*



Occupation: regional director of marketing for a local hospital system








Why are you running for Plano City Council?



KP: I’m running for re-election to City Council because I want to get things done for your family and mine. One of the best parts about serving in local government is how close you are to the people and the real impact you get to make on people’s daily lives. I want to make life better for people in Plano.



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



KP: I began volunteering in our city in 2008 when I was appointed to the Plano Parks and Recreation Board, where I served for five years with three of those years serving as chair of the board. I went on to serve on the Plano Planning and Zoning Commission for nearly three years. I was elected to serve the citizens of Plano in May of 2017, and in that time I have advocated for improving aging infrastructure, investing in the safety of our community, economic development, providing enhanced safety measures on our local trails and lowering taxes. I currently serve as the mayor pro tem on the city council and on the Executive Board of the North Central Texas Council of Governments.



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



KP: Safety: Plano has always placed the highest priority on keeping its people safe. I will prioritize equipping Plano Fire-Rescue and the Plano Police Department with the necessary training and resources to continue to provide a high level of service with low response times for our citizens.

Mobility: The ability to move efficiently and effectively between home, work, school and the places we enjoy spending time is a key component to maintaining a high quality of life for our citizens. We must invest in our aging road infrastructure and place a high priority on improving neighborhood streets and alleys.

Revitalization: Plano has always been a thriving and vibrant city that people have chosen to call home. We need to keep Plano a place we all want to call home for years to come by promoting reinvestment in mature neighborhoods and our US 75 corridor.

People: Great people are the heartbeat and core of any great community, and Plano is full of great people. In order to remain a vibrant city, we must continually work to keep our citizens engaged and invested in our community. I will work to build a strong sense of community by bringing people together through the increased use of technology and innovative approaches to enhancing our citizen's quality of life.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



KP: Plano’s aging roadways are our biggest transportation-related challenge. Roads in poor condition slow people down, leading to congestion and unwanted car repairs. The city will need to evaluate alternative methods for repair and replacement of our roads that can help decrease the costs of repairs and lengthen the life span of our roads. Utilizing thin asphalt overlays and using advanced software and tracking mechanisms that can better help identify and prioritize the most needed areas of road work will help us maintain the high quality of roads our citizens have come to expect in Plano.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



KP: Plano needs more diverse housing options to meet the needs of our community. For example, we have many seniors that would like to downsize from a large multi-story home to a smaller single-story home but have trouble finding an available home. We need to encourage the development of more diverse housing options to be built in Plano, such as bungalow-style housing, small single-family homes and duplexes.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



KP: It has been an honor to serve the citizens of Plano over the past four years. There are many things that we have accomplished for our citizens over the past several years such as the redevelopment of Collin Creek Mall, increasing the number of school resource officers in our schools to help promote safety for our students, and the North Texas Municipal Water District's member cities coming together to agree to a new contract that will benefit Plano citizens for generations to come. I'm also proud of the way I have been able to listen to all citizen viewpoints and collaborate with all of my colleagues on council to help find meaningful solutions to issues for the betterment of our city today and in the future. I’m in this for Plano, not for politics.



By William C. Wadsack
William C. Wadsack is the senior reporter for the Plano and Richardson editions of Community Impact Newspaper. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana before joining Community Impact Newspaper in 2019.


MOST RECENT

Cajun restaurant Storming Crab is now open in McKinney. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Storming Crab restaurant open in McKinney; Romeo's Pizza comes to Frisco and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

The reformer Pilates studio offers 50-minute classes that focus on quick transitions throughout a beat-based, high-intensity, full-body workout. (Courtesy Session Pilates)
Session Pilates to open a Plano location later this summer

The reformer Pilates studio offers 50-minute classes that focus on quick transitions throughout a beat-based, high-intensity, full-body workout.

Food.
Steve Fields' Steakhouse to open later this year in Plano

Steve Fields initially hoped to have the new restaurant ready by Sept. 1 of this year, but now estimates it is likely to open in late September or early October.

The Texas Central rail connection from Dallas to Houston will feature a bullet train similar to this one. (Courtesy Texas Central Partners/Community Impact Newspaper)
Texas Supreme Court declines to review high-speed rail case, freeing company up to use eminent domain

Texas Central, the company looking to build a 236-mile high-speed rail line connecting Houston and Dallas, has been given a big win in an ongoing legal battle over whether the company is legally recognized as a "railroad company" under state law.

Bojangles recently announced it signed a franchise agreement to open a new location in Richardson. (Courtesy Bojangles)
Bojangles fried chicken coming to Richardson; bar and grill opens at Grapevine golf course and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

The spa features anti-aging and skin treatments, such as microdermabrasion. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Issil Beauty Spa coming to Plano in July

The spa features anti-aging and skin treatments such as fibroblasting, microneedling, dermaplaning and microdermabrasion.

The Taiwanese restaurant serves pancakes, rice rolls, soups, soy milk drinks and more. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Tao Roll and Pancake now serving Taiwanese food in Plano

The restaurant serves pancakes, rice rolls, soups, soy milk drinks and more.

The family-friendly play center offers a variety of games and climbing obstacles for children. (Courtesy Safari Run)
Safari Run celebrates five-year anniversary in Plano

The family-friendly play center offers a variety of games and climbing obstacles for children.

The Mexican restaurant offers a variety of tortas, prepared with beans, tomato, avocado, onion and mayo, as well as antojitos, burritos and tacos. (Courtesy La Hechizera Tortas)
La Hechizera Tortas now open in Plano

The Mexican restaurant offers a variety of tortas, prepared with beans, tomato, avocado, onion and mayo, as well as antojitos, burritos and tacos.

The Mediterranean fast-food concept offers signature shawarma rolls and rice bowls in varying degrees of spice levels. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Chop House Gyro opens Plano location

The Mediterranean fast-food restaurant offers signature shawarma rolls and rice bowls in varying degrees of spice levels.