Election Q&A: Candidates for Plano City Council Place 4

Learn more about the candidates running for Plano City Council Place 4 ahead of the May 1 election. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Learn more about the candidates running for Plano City Council Place 4 ahead of the May 1 election. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Learn more about the candidates running for Plano City Council Place 4 ahead of the May 1 election. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

Learn more about the candidates running for Plano City Council Place 4 ahead of the May 1 election.

Editor’s note: An asterisk(*) indicates the candidate is an incumbent. Candidates are listed in alphabetical order by last name.


DALLAS-FORT WORTH



Plano City Council Place 4










Justin Adcock



Occupation: client manager, Alacrity Solutions








Why are you running for Plano City Council?



JA: I see ways that council members can make a difference in Plano, and I want to do my part to bring about those positive changes to our community. I want to restore trust in our city government, through transparency and accountability. In a time of divisive rhetoric, I want to stop the name-calling and focus on policies that benefit our suburban lifestyle and thriving business environment.



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



JA: I manage a $100,000,000 account with a Fortune 100 company, overseeing a team of 300 people in 30 states. This involves budgeting, planning, quality assurance, and customer relations.

For the past 10 years, my wife and I have also owned a small business in Plano that deals in manufacturing parts and equipment. This involves negotiating, accounting, and strategizing for future growth.

While these qualifications give me the knowledge and skills to effectively oversee city government, I feel my ability to listen, empathize, and relate to people are just as important for successfully representing citizens as their council member. I commit to listening to each issue with an open mind and making decisions based on what is best for the future of Plano.



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



JA: 1. Stop high-density development around Plano which adds to traffic congestion, lower property values, and high-class school sizes.

2. Continue to implement the effective tax rate to keep homeowner property taxes from rising.


3. Maintain the lifestyle amenities like parks and libraries that our residents love and value and fully support our excellent first responders.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



JA: Our roads and infrastructure were not built to accommodate our current population. The explosion of high-density developments has put a tremendous burden on our roads that is way past their capacity. While there are some measures which must be taken to mitigate these detrimental consequences, we must pause any further high-density developments, until traffic studies and long-term solutions can be achieved.

Public transportation is not feasible in the vast majority of the city, so having a car is necessary to get around. Therefore, our budget must focus on providing high-quality and safe roads for our residents and first responders.

Workplaces are adjusting to a post-Covid world so we should review our current plan for growth and development and make sure we are utilizing city resources effectively.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



JA: Plano citizens have continually stated they favor smaller, patio-style homes, rather than high-density housing. Many senior residents would love to downsize but have no options. By allowing for these smaller homes, it will free up the larger residences in neighborhoods for new families. These families will renovate and spend money in the community, further helping our economy. I believe in reinvigorating our neighborhoods – not overwhelming them.

Plano continually attracts the best companies from around the nation due to our business-friendly nature, neighborhoods, and lifestyle amenities. We should continue to attract these businesses and focus on providing quality jobs and opportunities for our residents.

I will support planning and zoning that encourages land use for smaller homes or new business. We have enough high-density residential developments, so more is not needed or beneficial to our community.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



JA: I’m a husband, and a father of four great kids. Two are currently in PISD schools, and the other two are soon to be enrolled as well. We attend Prestonwood Baptist Church, where I taught my son’s Sunday school class, and coached my daughter’s soccer team through Prestonwood Sports Organization. We have a dog, Bear, that we enjoy taking to Plano’s many parks. We love living in Plano, and want to keep it one of the best cities to raise a family!









Nassat Parveen



Occupation: academic tutor and early development educator








Why are you running for Plano City Council?



NP: My family and I made the city of Plano our home since I was 4 years old. After all the lessons, experiences, and livelihood this city brought us, I now want to contribute and give back to our community ... It’s vital that we continue preserving and expanding on these amenities for the next generation of Plano residents...

When my family and I first arrived here, we had much more affordable housing options and the traffic was not nearly as congested. It’s imperative that Plano continues being a place where people get to live where they work, and families experience a great quality of life here...

Representing the millennial generation, I want to also encourage more of our young professionals to continue living here by expanding our pro-business climate so they too could start their businesses here and even start their families here...



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



NP: I am dedicated to serving our community and leading this city in a direction which best fits the needs of our residents ... I started volunteering in local grassroots campaigns at the age of 17. My ability to speak 7 different languages helped me connect with several different people here in Plano and encourage them to also get involved in our democratic process.

... My studies in neuroscience and psychology helped me understand the science behind the way people think, feel and behave ... I’ve been a long-term volunteer for several nonprofits ... I’ve also volunteered in many youth group organizations ... and mentored our youth to start serving their communities early on and gave them guidance on how to build strong leadership skills ... I started my own Project Purpose community advocacy program which helped our veterans and our at-risk youth communities...

There is so much we can do even at the local level as a city council member to continue working on those issues in a way where it directly affects people through simple policy changes...



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



NP: COVID-19 has drastically changed our world and affected our economy as well as our physical and mental health ... My first priority will be on eradicating this virus from our city. This means I will work to make vaccines more accessible for our residents. I also plan on revitalizing the local small businesses here that were affected ... I will also work to make sure CDC guidelines are followed in public spaces...

My second priority will be to work on our housing. As our city is expanding and more people are working here, I will work to make sure our housing is affordable and ensure that there are a variety of housing options according to each of the specific demographics that live here ... Seniors living here should be able to downsize on their properties without losing profit and employees that work for our local corporate and small businesses should also be able to find housing options near where they work.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



NP: Our city’s traffic and congestion will be another issue we face as our city grows. In order to alleviate this issue, we need to start having more mass transit and public transportation options. I would like to continue working with Dallas Area Rapid Transit, but also have our own local bus system where residents can get across the entire city here ... We need to start working on having more walkable communities and also expand on our bike alleys. This will ... help decrease global emissions and help our climate as well.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



NP: The type of housing units we create and where we choose to locate them will be an issue which arises from real estate development. I plan on always making sure that we develop strategically and according to the needs of our citizens. Single-family housing units should be placed near schools while multi-family housing units are best suited in areas near the central expressway. All other types of homes should be built kept near places of employment so that way people could easily walk to work and help with our traffic situation.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



NP: I will always listen to the concerns of our residents and plan on being as accessible as possible and am willing to even put down my own biases for the greater good of others that live here ... Anyone who wishes to share their thoughts, ideas, or concerns with me ... I would love to hear them.








Kayci Prince*



Occupation: regional director of marketing for a local hospital system








Why are you running for Plano City Council?



KP: I’m running for re-election to city council because I want to get things done for your family and mine. One of the best parts about serving in local government is how close you are to the people and the real impact you get to make on people’s daily lives. I want to make life better for people in Plano.



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



KP: I began volunteering in our city in 2008 when I was appointed to the Plano Parks and Recreation Board where I served for five years with three of those years serving as chair of the board. I went on to serve on the Plano Planning and Zoning Commission for nearly three years. I was elected to serve the Citizens of Plano in May of 2017 and in that time I have advocated for improving aging infrastructure, investing in the safety of our community, economic development, providing enhanced safety measures on our local trails and lowering taxes. I currently serve as the Mayor Pro Tem on the city council and on the Executive Board of the North Central Texas Council of Governments.



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



KP: Safety: Plano has always placed the highest priority on keeping its people safe. I will prioritize equipping Plano Fire-Rescue and the Plano Police Department with the necessary training and resources to continue to provide a high-level of service with low response times for our citizens.

Mobility: The ability to move efficiently and effectively between home, work, school, and the places we enjoy spending time is a key component to maintaining a high quality of life for our citizens. We must invest in our aging road infrastructure and place a high priority on improving neighborhood streets and alleys.

Revitalization: Plano has always been a thriving and vibrant city that people have chosen to call home. We need to keep Plano a place we all want to call home for years to come by promoting reinvestment in mature neighborhoods and our US-75 corridor.

People: Great people are the heartbeat and core of any great community, and Plano is full of great people. In order to remain a vibrant city, we must continually work to keep our citizens engaged and invested in our community. I will work to build a strong sense of community by bringing people together through the increased use of technology and innovative approaches to enhancing our citizen's quality of life.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



KP: Plano’s aging roadways are our biggest transportation-related challenge. Roads in poor condition slow people down, leading to congestion and unwanted car repairs. The City will need to evaluate alternative methods for repair and replacement of our roads that can help decrease the costs of repairs and lengthen the life span of our roads. Utilizing thin asphalt overlays and using advanced software and tracking mechanisms that can better help identify and prioritize the most needed areas of road work will help us maintain the high quality of roads our citizens have come to expect in Plano.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



KP: Plano needs more diverse housing options to meet the needs of our community. For example, we have many seniors that would like to downsize from a large multi-story home to a smaller single-story home but have trouble finding an available home. We need to encourage the development of more diverse housing options to be built in Plano, such as bungalow-style housing, small single-family homes and duplexes.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



KP: It has been an honor to serve the citizens of Plano over the past four years. There are many things that we have accomplished for our citizens over the past several years such as the redevelopment of Collin Creek Mall, increasing the number of school resource officers in our schools to help promote safety for our students, and the North Texas Municipal Water District's member cities coming together to agree to a new contract that will benefit Plano citizens for generations to come. I'm also proud of the way I have been able to listen to all citizen viewpoints and collaborate with all of my colleagues on council to help find meaningful solutions to issues for the betterment of our city today and in the future. I’m in this for Plano, not for politics.








Vidal Quintanilla



Occupation: executive director of Human Resources, GI Alliance









Why are you running for Plano City Council?



VQ: There are many reasons why I chose the community of Plano as my home. Its tranquil neighborhoods, eclectic mix of local businesses, highly rated schools, and low crime rate are just a few aspects that attracted me to this suburban community.

I have decided to run for city council in order to help preserve the essence of this thriving and growing community. I want to assure that its residents can continue to experience the same quality of life for which Plano is known for in all aspects including housing, education, and economic development.



What are your qualifications for seeking this office?



VQ: I hold a Bachelors degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resources in addition to a Master’s Degree in Public Health (MPH) with an emphasis on health policy and management. Both of my degrees have equipped me with the skills sets and knowledge that will be a valuable asset to the city council.

In the era of COVID-19, my public health educational background will be an invaluable asset. I will help the city council interpret data and will assist in helping to make the most sound community health recommendations.



If elected, what would be your top priorities?



VQ: My top priorities if elected are education, public health, and economic development. These three areas of concentration arguably have the greatest impact in affecting the quality of life for the residents of Plano.

Over the past several years, Plano has seen an increase in high-density development projects focused primarily on multi-family housing. This has led to overcrowding of our city infrastructure and has increased the population density. The education of our children, the public health of our residents and the economic development of our city are therefore directly impacted making this issue one of my top priorities.



As Plano continues to grow and age, what do you see as the city’s top transportation and infrastructure-related concerns? How do you plan to address them?



VQ: With the expected population growth in Plano, our commutes will become increasingly congested. Our city’s infrastructure was originally built for a much smaller capacity. The city of Plano and City Council should work together to identify obstacles and propose solutions.

If we are adding additional projects to our city’s deck, then we must be prepared for the effects of such developmental items as it relates to the everyday citizens’ quality of life. Town hall meetings have seen citizens speak out about increasing road congestion, road construction, and traffic flow problems. Clearly residents are frustrated and hoping for change.



What do you see as the city's top issues related to housing and commercial real estate development? How do you plan to address them?



VQ: Currently Plano has an estimated 288,000 residents. It is projected that this number will grow to 300,000-310,000 over the next two years. The city’s ability to attract new residents and the many enhancement opportunities for development projects requires us to focus on single-family housing. The available property left in the city should be used strategically for economic development notably for new single-family households or businesses that would support the current quality of life for a suburban environment.

If elected, I would be able to voice these areas of concern to the city and vote in the best interest of Plano citizens. Urbanization in Plano is to be expected, but with proper planning, we can ensure our city’s infrastructure is not impacted negatively.


What else do you want voters to know about you?



VQ: I’m a very dedicated and hard worker. I pride myself in fully assessing decisions that are placed before me and taking every viewpoint into account ensuring I make the best-informed decision that produces the highest quality outcomes/results. I have a strong work ethic and I believe in integrity, fairness and equality. With these inherent core values, I believe I am qualified to be elected by the citizens of Plano as its next Place 4 Councilman.





Correction: A previous version of this article indicated multiple incumbents for this race, and the wrong race in one instance.
By Liesbeth Powers
Liesbeth graduated from Baylor University with a degree in new media journalism in December 2018. She gained her newspaper experience as a staff writer and multimedia editor at her campus paper, The Baylor Lariat. Liesbeth joined the Community Impact team in August 2019, where she reports on all things Plano and Richardson, including Plano City Council and Dallas Area Rapid Transit.


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