BY-CAMPUS BREAKDOWN: More Plano ISD families choose in-person learning for final 9 weeks of school year

Plano ISD will have 57% of its students in person for the final nine-weeks of the school year. (Community Impact staff)
Plano ISD will have 57% of its students in person for the final nine-weeks of the school year. (Community Impact staff)

Plano ISD will have 57% of its students in person for the final nine-weeks of the school year. (Community Impact staff)

Plano ISD experienced a districtwide increase in students opting for face-to-face instruction for the final nine weeks of the school year, which began March 15, according to data provided by the district.

Families were given the option to change their child's learning method in February, per Texas Education Agency requirements. The number of students attending school in-person rose to 57%, which is a 4% increase from the third nine weeks, while 43% of students have chosen virtual instruction, according to the data.

Hughston Elementary School now has the highest level of face-to-face instruction among elementary campuses, with 81% of students receiving instruction in classrooms. Skaggs Elementary has the smallest percentage of students signed up for in-person learning at 33%.

At the middle school level, Haggard has the largest percentage of students opting for face-to-face instruction, with 73% of students choosing that method. At the other end of the spectrum, Rice Middle School has only 35% of students attending in-person.

Vines High leads high school campuses with 62% of students opting for in-person instruction. Jasper High School, with only 30% of students in classrooms, has the smallest percentage of in-person students.


At the senior high level, Plano has the highest percentage of students choosing in-person instruction and Plano East has the lowest.

See the full campus breakdown here:
By William C. Wadsack

Editor, Plano

William joined Community Impact Newspaper in December 2019. He previously served as managing editor of several daily and weekly publications in North Texas and his native state of Louisiana.