Election Q&A: Candidates for Lewisville City Council Place 3

Meet the candidates running for Lewisville City Council Place 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Meet the candidates running for Lewisville City Council Place 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Meet the candidates running for Lewisville City Council Place 3. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Learn more about the candidates running for the Lewisville City Council Place 3 seat ahead of the May 1 election. Early voting is from April 19-27.


DALLAS-FORT WORTH



Lewisville City Council Place 3










Ronni Cade





Why are you running to represent Lewisville residents on the City Council?



RC: Lewisville, like most of Texas, is experiencing unprecedented growth and will need strong, experienced leaders who are familiar with working with our staff and other elected officials to determine the best strategy that works for the city. I have a 28-year history of serving the city of Lewisville and will be able to continue moving forward without losing the past and the traditions that makes Lewisville, Lewisville.



What will you bring to this office in terms of your qualifications or perspective?



RC: I have been a resident for well over 50 years. I am a public servant and citizen advocate that Lewisville can count on with years of experience and proven leadership, having served Lewisville the past 28-plus years on a civic, community and personal level. As a former Lewisville City Council person, my experience gives me the ability to rely on past knowledge and insight that makes it possible for me to make wise and good decisions, for the future of Lewisville, as a whole, from day one.



If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term?



RC: My first priority will be to really study the mid-year budget in order to see the full impact the pandemic has had on the city as a whole. From there take a look at the projects and programs that have been placed on hold, study the impact on positions and pay that were frozen and/or eliminated, then prioritize the next steps needs to be taken. After a review of the mid-year budget, any new projects and programs that are being requested, will then be prioritized.









Penny A. Mallet





Why are you running to represent Lewisville residents on the City Council?



PM: I decided to run for Lewisville City Council because if an issue matters to the residents and small business owners, city council members should address it. I want to ensure Lewisville residents get transparency from the city and have access to all the opportunities available. It’s always a bold decision to run for office and participate in the democratic process for our communities. I was a mother, wife and voter then I became a community leader and political leader. Lewisville is what a community looks like, caring for each other. Let us make everyone welcome. The act of running for office is talking to and listening to your voters, especially those who are too often left out of the conversations about their future in the community. I understand a successful elected official must devote a significant amount of time and energy to fulfill a position that answers directly to citizens. They need a general understanding of city government, willingness to learn about a wide range of topics, consistency, dedication to the interests of citizens and the community as a whole, strong communication and team-building skills, including being a good listener, openness to the thoughts and ideas of others, being approachable and accessible and willingness to work cooperatively with others.



What will you bring to this office in terms of your qualifications or perspective?



PM: A 25-year resident of Lewisville, I am married to my husband, Rawlin, and have one son living in Florida. I am an entrepreneur, community activist and political leader. I want to use my leadership skills with a vision of one community where all are welcome. Staying connected with the community’s needs and uplifting those who have difficulties is important to me. Community accomplishments include: Lewisville Chamber of Commerce Class of #34 2020 graduate; city of Lewisville Citizens University 2020 graduate; Lewisville Citizens Police Program 2019 graduate; member of the Lewisville CERT [Community Emergency Response Team] program; helped distribute COVID-19 vaccines in Lewisville and Denton County; finished the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma’s STOP THE BLEED Course in 2020; completed Census Training and helped Lewisville residents understand the importance of the Census and complete the forms in 2020; and served as Community Leader on the 2020 Mayor’s Commission.



If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term?



PM: If elected, I would advocate championing diversity and inclusion. In the city of Lewisville: Create a full-time position dedicated to championing diversity, inclusion, and transparency within the city organization and in public engagement; employee recruitment efforts focused on minority candidates through advertising, site visits and use of professional consultants; developing leadership inclusion for all city employees; reviewing the development of a public annual report on the demographic data related to new hires, promotions, and total workforce under the City umbrella. In the Lewisville Police Department: Reviewing the annual budget process and considering emerging trends to explore options for alternative responses to certain types of police calls through civilian personnel trained in mental health specializations, trained police personnel or a partnership with community service agencies; providing wider public awareness of access to police encounters via educational videos for all ninth graders under the Sandra Bland Act; and helping develop and implement a method for using body camera videos of officers; interactions as part of a follow-up training opportunity for identifying hidden biases. In the Lewisville Chamber of Commerce: Working with the city to ensure inclusiveness in small business workshops for chamber members; creating a City Economic Development and Chamber team to provide local businesses with the tools, training, and resources necessary to help businesses thrive; and working with the city and the chamber to give new life to the Music City Mall—the heart of our community. Grow Lewisville=Opportunities and Development.


By Valerie Wigglesworth
Valerie has been a journalist for more than 30 years. She is currently managing editor for DFW Metro for Community Impact Newspaper.


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