Passport fairs taking place in Plano following closure of Collin County offices

3

Two passport fairs are scheduled in Plano after the U.S. Department of State removed the Collin County District Clerk’s office from its list of approved facilities.

The fairs will allow people to apply for a passport and will take place at the following times at the Northwest Plano post office, located at 3905 Hedgcoxe Road, Plano:

  • 8 a.m.-2 p.m. July 6
  • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. July 20

No appointments are needed for the fairs.

The Collin County passport offices closed in March following a federal passport fraud investigation. Since then, some passport offices, such as the Frisco Public Library passport center, have reported being inundated with applications.

U.S. Rep. Van Taylor, R-Plano, helped to organize the passport fairs while his office works with the state department to find a long-term solution, according to a news release.

“Many constituents have reached out to me regarding access to the passport services,” Taylor said in a statement. “Advocating on their behalf, I’m pleased the state department as well as the U.S. Postal Service are working with me on these short-term fixes to help alleviate any backlog while we work toward a permanent solution.”

Share this story
3 comments
COMMENT
  1. Esam A Obiedat

    I was there 8:00 AM and there was more than 100 people waiting in the line! I turned back and scheduled for an appointment at USPS website.

Leave A Reply

Lindsey Juarez
Lindsey has been involved in newspapers in some form since high school. She graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 with a degree in Journalism. While attending UTA, she worked for The Shorthorn, the university's award-winning student newspaper. She was hired as Community Impact Newspaper's first Frisco reporter in 2014. Less than a year later, she took over as the editor of the Frisco edition. Since then, she has covered a variety of topics and issues important to the community, including the city's affordable housing shortage, the state's controversial A-F school accountability system and the city's "Bury the Lines" efforts.
Back to top