Everything you need to know for May 1 election in Northwest Austin

The Ben Hur Shrine Center in North Austin
The Ben Hur Shrine Center in North Austin, pictured here, is one of dozens of polling locations Travis County residents can cast their ballot May 1. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Ben Hur Shrine Center in North Austin, pictured here, is one of dozens of polling locations Travis County residents can cast their ballot May 1. (Iain Oldman/Community Impact Newspaper)

The early voting period for the May 1 joint local and special elections ended April 27. Registered voters in Travis and Williamson counties can still go to the polls May 1 to cast their ballots in selected races and propositions that affect a slew of local issues.

As of April 28, approximately 13% of all registered voters in Travis County cast early ballots, with about an 8% turnout of registered voters so far in Williamson County.

Here is what every resident in Northwest Austin should know about voting on May 1 for all eligible races.

Follow Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage of the May 1 elections here.



HOW AND WHERE TO VOTE


Voting can be done in person at hundreds of poll sites across both counties. As in recent years, Travis County or Williamson County residents can vote at any polling station in their respective jurisdiction, regardless of the precinct they live in.


For a full list of Travis County polling locations, click here. Polls are open 7 a.m.-7 p.m. on May 1.

For a full list of Williamson County polling locations, click here. Polls are open 7 am.-7 p.m. on May 1.

Several forms of identification are accepted at the polls for registered voters, including driver’s licenses, passports, gun licenses and more. For a full breakdown of accepted identification, please click here.

NORTHWEST AUSTIN RACES


Pflugerville ISD Place 1

There is only one competitive race for some Northwest Austin residents that will determine who sits in a local board.

In Pflugerville ISD, two candidates—David Aguirre and Marc Garcia—are vying for a seat on the district’s board of trustees. To read a Q&A from the candidates, click here.

The only other PfISD election this year is an uncontested race.

City of Austin propositions

Austin residents are faced with a total of eight ballot propositions this year. These propositions cover complex and impactful topics that include how the city is governed, Austin’s public camping ordinance, campaign finance reform and more.

Community Impact Newspaper has a full breakdown of each ballot proposition and what a "Yes" vote means for each item. For that primer on the May 1 ballot propositions, click here.
By Iain Oldman
Iain Oldman joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2017 after spending two years in Pittsburgh, Pa., where he covered Pittsburgh City Council. His byline has appeared in PublicSource, WESA-FM and Scranton-Times Tribune. Iain worked as the reporter for Community Impact Newspaper's flagship Round Rock/Pflugerville/Hutto edition and is now working as the editor for the Northwest Austin edition.