Mark Chesnutt to headline 2020 Red Poppy Festival in Georgetown

The annual Red Poppy Festival on the Georgetown Square runs April 24-26. (Courtesy Georgetown Convention & Visitors Bureau)
The annual Red Poppy Festival on the Georgetown Square runs April 24-26. (Courtesy Georgetown Convention & Visitors Bureau)

The annual Red Poppy Festival on the Georgetown Square runs April 24-26. (Courtesy Georgetown Convention & Visitors Bureau)

This year the Georgetown Red Poppy Festival Saturday night headliner will be country music singer-songwriter Mark Chesnutt, a news release said.

Chesnutt’s top singles include “Brother Jukebox,” “I’ll Think of Something,” “It Sure is Monday” and “I Just Wanted You to Know,” the release said.

The annual festival on the Georgetown Square runs April 24-26 with live music, entertainment, family fun, food, and more than 120 arts and craft vendors.

The Friday night concert features Dysfunkshun Junkshun. Other festival highlights include the Red Poppy parade Saturday at 10 a.m. and the car show Saturday at 11 a.m.

The official 2020 Red Poppy Festival poster is on sale for $5 starting April 3 at the Visitors Center at 103 W. Seventh St. The poster artist, Aisling Kelleher, will be at the Visitors Center April 3 from 6-8 p.m. signing posters. The first 50 posters are free.


See more at http://redpoppyfestival.com.
By Sally Grace Holtgrieve

Sally Grace Holtgrieve solidified her passion for news during her time as Editor-in-Chief of Christopher Newport University's student newspaper, The Captain's Log. She started her professional career at The Virginia Gazette and moved to Texas in 2015 to cover government and politics at The Temple Daily Telegram. She started working at Community Impact Newspaper in February 2018 as the Lake Travis-Westlake reporter and moved into the role of Georgetown editor in June 2019.


MOST RECENT

VIDEO: Texas Tribune interview with Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar about the coronavirus's effects on the state economy

At 8 a.m. April 7, The Texas Tribune will host a live interview with Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar, conducted by Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey.

The Texas Workforce Commission's phone and online systems to accept applications for unemployment benefits have been overwhelmed by hundreds of thousands of Texans who are out of work and looking for assistance. (Design by Shelby Savage/Community Impact Newspaper)
With Texas Workforce Commission overwhelmed by surging unemployment claims, Central Texas residents try to hang on

The Texas Workforce Commission received 1.7 million calls from individuals seeking assistance with unemployment benefits in a 24-hour period on March 26.

(Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Survey finds Texas brewers losing more than 70% of revenue because of coronavirus

Brewers across the state are renewing calls for Gov. Greg Abbott to grant temporary waivers for shipping, delivery and tax relief.

(Brian Perdue/Community Impact Newspaper)
April 6: 8 coronavirus stories Austin-area readers need to know

Catch up on some of the latest coronavirus updates for the Austin metro below.

Williamson County receives 1,000 test kits from a Georgia laboratory. (Screenshot courtesy Williamson County)
Williamson County receives 1,000 test kits from Georgia laboratory

County Judge Bill Gravell said the county is prioritizing tests for first responders and older adults.

Williamson County is moving to a virtual platform for Commissioners Court.  (Ali Linan/ Community Impact Newspaper)
Williamson County moves to virtual platform for Commissioners Court

Public comment will still take place at the courthouse; however, commissioners will attend virtually.

Laura E. Skandera Trombley was named the 16th president of Southwestern University on April 3. (Courtesy Southwestern University)
Southwestern University names its first woman president

Laura E. Skandera Trombley will start in her new role July 1.

(Graphic illustration courtesy Jay Jones/Community Impact Newspaper)
‘We’ve got this’: Central Texas librarians step up to help their communities amid coronavirus pandemic

The example in Bee Cave appears to be just one of many stories relating how, amid the COVID-19 crisis, librarians are helping their communities throughout the Greater Austin area.

Economic relief options for small business owners include the Small Business Administration's Economic Injury Disaster Loan. (Community Impact Newspaper Staff)
Has your Austin-area small business been affected by the coronavirus? Here are resources you can access.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering a short-term loan program intended to help cover payroll and a separate, long-term loan program intended to help business owners stay afloat.

A recent string of incidents where Zoom meetings have been “hacked” has put the future viability of teleconferencing security in doubt. (Courtesy Pixabay)
String of racist attacks via videoconferencing software leads to heightened security concerns

A recent string of incidents where Zoom meetings have been “hacked” has put the future viability of teleconferencing security in doubt.

Austin and Travis County's orders went into place March 25 and require residents to stay home for everything but essential travel. (Christopher Neely/Community Impact Newspaper)
5 recent coronavirus stories from the Austin area readers should know

Read local updates on the coronavirus pandemic.