We Are Blood seeks plasma donations from recovered COVID-19 patients

A screen grab from a video of Ray Benson
We Are Blood has enlisted local celebrities who have recovered from COVID-19, including Ray Benson of band Asleep at the Wheel, to enlist residents to donate plasma in a new advertising campaign. (Courtesy We Are Blood/Travis County)

We Are Blood has enlisted local celebrities who have recovered from COVID-19, including Ray Benson of band Asleep at the Wheel, to enlist residents to donate plasma in a new advertising campaign. (Courtesy We Are Blood/Travis County)

We Are Blood is seeking donations of plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients in Central Texas, stocking up on convalescent plasma to treat coronavirus patients in case of another surge in cases. At a Sept. 8 meeting, the regional blood donation organization presented the Travis County Commissioners Court with a request for $600,000 to aid in advertising and testing initiatives as the organization ramps up recruitment for plasma donors.

Austin-Travis County Health Authority Dr. Mark Escott said convalescent plasma is the best bet Central Texas physicians have in treating severe cases of COVID-19 and among the few treatment options that have shown success.

"It’s the the thing that we can get, and can get more of in that second surge of cases that we certainly expect to see this fall and this winter," Escott said. "We don’t have other options right now, and I think this represents the best hope that we have of maintaining a treatment, which we can self-produce for that event."

We Are Blood established a COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Program under the Mayo Clinic's Expanded Access Program for convalescent plasma in April. According to We Are Blood President and CEO Marshall Cothran, the organization was confident in its plasma stock until July, when cases surged in Travis County and the surrounding area. Within 10 days, We Are Blood's plasma inventory had been depleted. We Are Blood now has a comfortable stock of plasma again, but Cothran said he is determined to be ready if another surge occurs.

“It almost feels eerily like it felt in June, when we had built up this program for two months and we felt like we could handle anything. Then July came, and we couldn’t," Cothran said.


While We Are Blood seeks to ramp up its supply, it also faces a deadline from the Food and Drug Administration's new Emergency Use Authorization for COVID-19 convalescent plasma. The FDA's investigational program will broaden access to the treatment, but it will also require organizations such as We Are Blood to do additional testing of plasma units that measure the effectiveness, or titer, of antibodies in each donation by Dec. 1.

Over the coming months, We Are Blood aims to expand its donation pool to include Central Texans who may be unaware that they have been exposed to COVID-19. Through antibody testing, We Are Blood can determine if any blood donor is a candidate for convalescent plasma donation. Cothran estimates 51,000 antibody screening tests will be needed over the course of the program.

In order to recruit individuals who have recovered after testing positive for COVID-19, We Are Blood has proposed an advertising campaign featuring local celebrities who have recovered from the virus—such as Ray Benson of Asleep at the Wheel—encouraging recovered patients to make plasma donations.

The advertising campaign, as well as the antibody tests and plasma titer analysis kits needed to run the program for 12 months, would cost $600,000 of Travis County's CARES Act funds. County commissioners will vote on the allocation at a future meeting.

Individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 and wish to donate plasma can learn more at www.weareblood.org/convalescent-plasma.
By Olivia Aldridge

Multi-Platform Journalist

Olivia hosts and produces Community Impact Newspaper's podcasts, The Austin Breakdown, The Houston Breakdown and The DFW Breakdown. She launched the podcasts after nearly three years as a reporter for the newspaper, covering public health, business, development and Travis County government for the Central Austin edition. Olivia worked as a reporter and producer for South Carolina Public Radio before moving to Texas.