Send-off for cyclists, ballet folklorico and 4 other things to do this weekend in Central Austin

The Austin Pond Society hosts a series of self-guided pond and water garden tours June 3-4.

The Austin Pond Society hosts a series of self-guided pond and water garden tours June 3-4.

FRIDAY, JUNE 2

1. 70 cyclists get set for 4,000-mile journey


Austinites send 70 cyclists off on a 4,000-plus-mile ride from Austin to Anchorage, Alaska. Day Zero marks the day before the 14th-annual Texas 4000 ride begins. The bicycle ride is a fundraising and awareness-raising campaign in the fight against cancer. The public is invited to help honor and wish the students good luck as they depart on a 70-day adventure. Dean Sharon Wood of the Cockrell School of Engineering will speak as well as receive a $130,000 grant donation by the Texas 4000 2017 riders to the University of Texas Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Noon-2 p.m. Free. LBJ Library and Museum lawn, The University of Texas, 2313 Red River St., Austin. www.texas4000.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 3

2. Roy Lozano’s Ballet Folklorico de Texas Fiesta


The annual celebration of Mexican folk dance features ballet folklorico performances and live music by Juan Diaz. Mexican regions represented in the dances include Nayarit, Chihuahua, Oaxaca and Veracruz. 7 p.m. (doors open), 8 p.m. (show starts). $15-$25. Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress Ave. 512-928-1111.

7 p.m. (doors open), 8 p.m. (show starts). $15-$25. Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress Ave., Austin. 512-928-1111. www.balletfolkloricodetexas.com

3. Art Bra Austin


The fully costumed, professionally produced runway show and auction raises funds to support local women who have survived breast cancer. The show features 60 models, all breast cancer survivors and clients of the Breast Cancer Resource Centers of Texas, which provides free services to clients affected by breast cancer.

6-10 p.m. $200-$250. Austin Convention Center, 500 E. Cesar Chavez St., Austin. http://artbraaustin.org

4. LuluFest Austin


The inaugural event is a festival of women-led bands featuring musical styles, such as jazz, western swing, Latin and Brazilian music. During the day, workshops focus on basic jazz improvisation skills.

Noon-3:30 p.m. (workshops), 5-10 p.m. (concerts). $15 (students, workshops or concerts only), $30 (general admission, workshops or concerts only), $50 (all-day festival pass). The Carriage House and Jones Auditorium, St. Edward’s University, 3001 S. Congress Ave., Austin. www.lulu-fest.com

5. Local water garden tours


Wristband buyers take a tour of 20 Austin-area ponds. The tour begins Saturday with a tour of Georgetown, Leander and Cedar Park parks then moves south on Sunday with eight South Austin and Spicewood ponds. The tour is self-guided.

Continues until Sunday. $20-$25. Various locations. 512-288- 5133. www.austinpondsociety.org

6. Free screening of 'Matilda'


Part of a summerlong series of family-friendly films at the Bullock Museum, the movie based on the Roald Dahl novel will be shown for free. All seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis with priority seating for members beginning at 1:30 p.m. All other guests will begin seating at 1:40 p.m. Concessions from the IMAX lobby will be allowed in the theater.

1:30 p.m. Free. The Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 Congress Ave., Austin. 512-936-8746. www.thestoryoftexas.com/visit/calendar/sfffs-matilda-20170306
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By JJ Velasquez

The Central Austin editor since 2016, JJ covers city government and other topics of community interest—when he's not editing the work of his prolific writers. He began his tenure at Community Impact Newspaper as the reporter for its San Marcos | Buda | Kyle edition covering local government and public education. The Laredo, Texas native is also a web developer whose mission is to make the internet a friendly place for finding objective and engaging news content.


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