Austin Animal Center closing on Sundays due to short staffing

Puppy Camilo and other adoptable animals at the Austin Animal Center will still be taken care of on Sundays, though the shelter will be closed to the public temporarily starting Jan. 23. (Courtesy Austin Animal Center)
Puppy Camilo and other adoptable animals at the Austin Animal Center will still be taken care of on Sundays, though the shelter will be closed to the public temporarily starting Jan. 23. (Courtesy Austin Animal Center)

Puppy Camilo and other adoptable animals at the Austin Animal Center will still be taken care of on Sundays, though the shelter will be closed to the public temporarily starting Jan. 23. (Courtesy Austin Animal Center)

The Austin Animal Center is struggling to fill vacant positions, and in response it will be temporarily closing on Sundays starting Jan. 23, according to a news release from the animal shelter.

Direct animal care staff and volunteers will continue to provide care to the more than 250 adoptable animals currently residing at the no-kill shelter on Sundays, according to the news release and the shelter’s roster of adoptable animals.

The center will still be open for adoption and animal reclaiming Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and for intake Monday through Friday during the same hours. Owners looking to reclaim their pets on Sundays can contact 311 and request an animal protection officer.

A wave of local staffing shortages has struck businesses across many industries. Tamara Atkinson, CEO of Workforce Solutions Capital Area, which supports job seekers in the nine counties surrounding Austin, said in October that she has seen staffing shortages across the region.

Data from Atkinson’s organization showed that from 2019-21, total job postings in Williamson County increased by 11.1%.


AAC is hiring for several open positions. Candidates can apply through the city of Austin website.
By Maggie Quinlan

Reporter, Southwest Austin/Dripping Springs

Maggie joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in July 2021 after a year spent covering crime, courts and politics at The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, near the border with Idaho. In Southwest Austin and Dripping Springs, Maggie covers education, business, healthcare, transportation, real estate development and nonprofits. Prior to CI, she graduated from Washington State University, where she was managing editor of the student newspaper and a section editor at her hometown newspaper based in Moscow, Idaho. Maggie dreamed of living in the Austin area for years and feels honored to serve the communities of Southwest Austin and Dripping Springs.