Here are four ways to celebrate New Year’s Eve in Central Austin

The city of Austin hosts a family-friendly and alcohol-free New Years' Eve bash with live music and a fireworks show. Courtesy Chris Sherman
The city of Austin hosts a family-friendly and alcohol-free New Years' Eve bash with live music and a fireworks show. Courtesy Chris Sherman

The city of Austin hosts a family-friendly and alcohol-free New Years' Eve bash with live music and a fireworks show. Courtesy Chris Sherman

Party with your neighbors

The city of Austin hosts a family-friendly and alcohol-free New Year’s Eve bash with live music and a fireworks show. Local food trucks will be on-site. Past headliners have included local bands Superfónicos and Los Coast. 7:30-10 p.m. Free. Vic Mathias Shores, 900 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. 512-974-7819. www.austintexas.gov/any

Watch the ball(oons) drop

Thinkery hosts its fourth annual Noon Year’s Eve balloon drop and Bubble Wrap-stomp. Guests can enjoy music, winter crafts and kid-mosas. 9 a.m.-noon, 1-4 p.m. $20 (members), $25 (nonmembers). Thinkery, 1830 Simond Ave., Austin. 512-469-6200. www.thinkeryaustin.org

Catch a show at ACL Live


Local duo Ghostland Observatory performs, making it the first time in years that Willie Nelson has not headlined the New Year’s Eve show. Nelson will begin a run of 16 shows over two months Jan. 3 in California. 9 p.m. $59-$79. Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theater, 310 Willie Nelson Drive, Austin. 512-225-7999. www.acl-live.com

Celebrate at the library

The Central Library hosts its second annual event on its rooftop garden, which offers views of fireworks. Local band White Denim performs, and apps and snacks are provided by local business ELM Restaurant Group, owner of Cookbook Cafe and 24 Diner. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $225-$250. Austin Central Library, 710 W. Cesar Chavez St., Austin. www.eventbrite.com
By Jack Flagler

Jack is the editor for Community Impact's Central Austin edition. He graduated in 2011 from Boston University and worked as a reporter and editor at newspapers in Maine, Massachusetts and North Carolina before moving to Austin in January of 2018.


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