Plano City Council to bring back withdrawn Envision Oak Point plan for consideration

Lavon Farms, a family-owned dairy farm in east Plano, sits at the heart of the cityu2019s development plans for the Oak Point area.

Lavon Farms, a family-owned dairy farm in east Plano, sits at the heart of the cityu2019s development plans for the Oak Point area.

The Plano City Council left Tuesday’s meeting determined to vote on a development vision for the city’s eastern Oak Point area that had been withdrawn previously for lack of apparent consensus on the council.

Council members on Tuesday directed the city staff to bring back the Envision Oak Point plan at a future meeting without any substantial revisions to the most recent draft. Plano City Manager Bruce Glasscock, who withdrew the plan from council consideration in May citing potentially “unresolvable” differences, said the vote could be scheduled for the council’s July 23 meeting.

The Envision Oak Point plan, if approved, would send a signal to potential developers that the city is likely to support zoning changes that align with a singular vision for the area informed by a yearlong study and public input process.

“The purpose of a vision is to let those [developers] who want to come here know that we clearly have an idea of what we want our community to look like,” Mayor Harry LaRosiliere said in support of the plan. “If we don’t have a vision, the capital and those who want to invest will go to the place where there is.”

Based on statements of direction provided by council members, city planning officials were expected to alter some language in the plan to clarify it does not require the city to use tools like economic incentive agreements to attract businesses to the area, leaving that option open for future council deliberations.

The council did not collectively request changes to address other provisions of concern for some residents, including the density of the residential developments in the plan. Council Member Anthony Ricciardelli said Tuesday he would like to see the plan contain fewer residential elements, opting instead for more office uses.

Council Member Ron Kelley, who voted last year against an approved zoning change for the city’s nearby Legacy Central development and cautioned at the time against a “disturbing trend” of redevelopment efforts being driven by multifamily projects, said Tuesday the Oak Point area was in need of some kind of plan to guide the change he viewed as inevitable.

“The fact of the matter is, in all likelihood, this part of town is going to be developed and redeveloped over time because of property owner rights,” Kelley said.

Council Member Tom Harrison said he opposed the plan. Harrison has voted against apartment-heavy development plans in the past, including Legacy Central. On Tuesday, he said the council was “wasting time and energy” on the Oak Point plan, which he said could be rescinded if more apartment opponents join the council in next year’s municipal elections.

The plan that will be presented in July has undergone revisions from its original draft. After a public feedback session with Plano Planning and Zoning commissioners and council members in January, city officials lowered the number of projected apartment units outlined in the plan by 38 percent.

The number of small-lot housing units—which include townhouses, cottage houses and attached single-family residences—rose from 400 to 610 in the amended plan. Detached single-family homes rose from 800 to 945 as part of the same series of changes.

Glasscock withdrew the plans from the council’s consideration May 14 after he concluded there were fundamental disagreements about the facts in the proposal—some of which, he said at the time, may be “unresolvable.”

“I don’t know that we can address all the concerns, to be truthful,” Glasscock told Plano City Council members at the time.

But after Tuesday’s meeting, Glasscock appeared satisfied that the proposal could be brought forward for consideration again.
By Daniel Houston
Daniel Houston covers city government, transportation, business and education for Community Impact Newspaper in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village. A Fort Worth native and Baylor University graduate, Daniel reported previously for The Associated Press in Oklahoma City and The Dallas Morning News.


MOST RECENT

EchoPark began selling preowned vehicles in Plano on Dec. 8 at 4400 W. Plano Parkway. (Courtesy EchoPark Automotive)
Pre-owned car dealership EchoPark now open in Plano

The vehicle sales company offers an assortment of 1- to 4-year-old preowned vehicles with more than 400 vehicles on-site at the Plano location.

Children's Health announced in early 2020 it plans to construct a new, seven-story hospital tower by 2023, nearly doubling its facilities in Plano. (Rendering courtesy Children's Health)
Replat, revised site plan approved for Children's Medical Center Plano expansion

Children's Health system took a step toward future expansion at its Plano campus with a March 1 Planning and Zoning Commission decision.

The special election will be held in conjunction with races for Places 2, 4, 6—the mayoral seat—and 8, as well as with the vote on bond propositions. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Place 7 candidates finalized for Plano City Council special election

Candidates will run for Place 7 in a special election in conjunction with the races for Places 2, 4, 6—the mayoral seat—and 8, as well as with the vote on bond propositions.

Scooter's Coffee is now open at 1451 E. Buckingham Road in Richardson. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)
Scooter's Coffee opens in Richardson; Hawaiian Bros restaurant coming to Fort Worth and more DFW-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Harvest Hall officially opened Feb. 6 in Grapevine as part of the Grapevine Main development. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)
Harvest Hall now open in Grapevine, new dining options in Fort Worth and more DFW news from February

Here are some of the top stories from the past month from the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

digital rendering of virus
Collin County Judge Chris Hill rescinds COVID-19 disaster declaration

Collin County’s declaration of local disaster in response to COVID-19 was rescinded Feb. 26 by Judge Chris Hill.

Two hundred rail pieces were delivered east of Shiloh Road in Plano in late 2020, according to a Dec. 18 DART release. (Courtesy Dallas Area Rapid Transit)
DART to save millions on Silver Line project following approval of refinanced loan from U.S. Department of Transportation

The $908 million loan was approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Build America Bureau in 2018, according to a Feb. 25 news release.

At its peak of power loss, the city had roughly 50,000 homes with interrupted power, many of which had prolonged outages, Plano City Manager Mark Israelson said. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Plano faces long-term impacts from storm; Collin County vaccine hubs resume service and more DFW-area news

Read the top business and community news from this week from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during a winter storm that hit Texas the night of Feb. 14. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
Legislators probe energy officials over power failures, lack of preparation heading into winter storm

The Texas Legislature held hearings Feb. 25 with energy companies including Oncor Electric Delivery and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas in response to last week’s historic winter storm, which left millions of Texans without electricity for days.

Texas Health Resources nurse Karen Schmidt administers a Pfizer vaccination Plano resident Connie Cordova's arm Feb. 5. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)
Vaccine rollout unfolds in Plano through city, county coordination

The city of Plano is actively working to help residents who want COVID-19 vaccines receive them as soon as possible, officials said.

In the northeast quadrant of DART's coverage area—which includes Plano, Richardson, northeast Dallas, Rowlett and Garland—current plans show new and expanded GoLink zones, with current bus routes being replaced by shuttle service. (Courtesy DART)
Draft for DART network redesign shows increase in shuttle service, access in areas of Plano, Richardson

In the northeast quadrant of DART's coverage area—which includes Plano, Richardson, northeast Dallas, Rowlett and Garland—current plans show new and expanded GoLink zones, with current bus routes being replaced by shuttle service.

Front of restaurant.
BoomerJack's Grill & Bar offers dog-friendly patio at new Plano location

The business offers American food and beverages, wall-to-wall televisions for watching sports, and backyard-style patios.