How it works: Cities tap into various local, state, federal sources for transportation funding

When faced with constructing new roads or improving existing thoroughfares, cities do not always have to draw from their own coffers to fund their road projects.

When faced with constructing new roads or improving existing thoroughfares, cities do not always have to draw from their own coffers to fund their road projects.

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Cities tap into various local, state, federal sources for transportation funding
When faced with constructing new roads or improving existing thoroughfares, cities do not always have to draw from their own coffers to fund their road projects.

Regional councils of governments are often responsible for coordinating with the Texas Department of Transportation to distribute available dollars from the state.

However, that funding is not always guaranteed. The transportation councils review city applications for transportation aid and award the funding to the cities evaluated as having the most need. That need takes shape in different ways, be it road repairs to strengthen road safety or innovative mobility solutions.

Cities can also get aid from the county or counties they are part of from available bond funds, whether it is for projects already named in the initial bond proposal, or projects that cities bring to the counties for individual consideration.

The federal government also provides aid to cities for their road projects, but usually requires the cities to match at least 20 percent of the cost.