Sugar Land and Missouri City transportation updates

Houston's drainage fund has faced multiple legal challenges.

Houston's drainage fund has faced multiple legal challenges.

Transportation updates


 

 

1. Lexington Boulevard closure


Work crews are installing a storm sewer below Lexington Boulevard in Sugar Land. The south side of the street is closed between Colonists Park and Sugar Crossing drives. However, the north side of Lexington is open to two-way traffic, which will use the lanes on the north side of the median.


Timeline: May 2017-March 2018
Cost: $3.2 million
Funding sources: city of Sugar Land



2. Chimney Rock Road extension


County work crews are extending Chimney Rock Road in Missouri City from Acorn Glenn Trail to Cambridge Falls Drive, building a four-lane boulevard and adding a stormwater system.


Timeline: May 2017-September 2018
Cost: $1.8 million
Funding sources: Fort Bend County



3. Trammel Fresno road widening


County work crews began work to widen Trammel Fresno Road in Missouri City from two to four lanes between Vicksburg Boulevard and Hurricane Lane. The road is closed, but a detour route will be set up to allow drivers to travel on Hurricane Lane north toward Lake Olympia or south toward Hwy. 6.

Timeline: June 2017-June 2018
Cost: $10 million
Funding sources: Texas Department of Transportation, city of Missouri City, Fort Bend County



4. Adams Street rebuild


Work crews will begin repaving Adams Street between Texas Parkway and Fifth Street in Missouri City. This section of roadway was identified as needing a total reconstruction as part of a citywide pavement evaluation.


Timeline: summer 2017-summer 2018
Cost: $2.5 million
Funding sources: city of Missouri City



5. Glenn Lake Bridge reconstruction


Construction is set to begin this summer on a new bridge over Oyster Creek east of Hwy. 6 at Glenn Lakes Lane.


Timeline: summer 2017-summer 2018Cos
Cost: $3.6 million
Funding sources: city of Missouri City







How it works 


Who builds roads around new developments?




Transportation updates As rapid development continues around the state, the Texas Department of Transportation and local entities create public-private partnerships to build roads around new developments.[/caption]

As rapid development continues around the state, the Texas Department of Transportation and local entities create public-private partnerships to build roads around new developments.


Developers often approach TxDOT about building roadways that connect to their businesses or improving nearby traffic lights, TxDOT spokesperson Danny Perez said. If the project also improves traffic flow, the two entities enter an agreement with the developer contributing a portion or all of the costs of the project.


Perez said developers have funded a number of transportation projects—even a $2 million ramp reversal on I-45 in Galveston County two years ago. 


Developers can also build roads themselves. The company would need to submit its plan to TxDOT—or whichever entity owns the roadway it would connect to—for approval. The developer would retain the right of way in this case.


After the road is built, the developer has the option to return the right of way to TxDOT or another entity for long-term maintenance of the road.