8 questions Hutto asks its residents in land-use survey

Hutto officials have set several meetings to explain this map.

Hutto officials have set several meetings to explain this map.

Officials from the city of Hutto are hoping residents and business owners will take a few minutes to fill out a survey.

The survey addresses the future land-use map, which is being updated during the next couple months. The first of several public forums was held Tuesday. Participants were asked to fill out the survey at the meeting or do so online at www.surveymonkey.com/r/huttoflum. The last day to submit a survey is March 23.

The future land-use map, addressed because of Hutto’s rapid growth, is a vision of the city’s future growth for the next 10 to 20 years.

The survey includes the following questions:

·      What do you like best about living in Hutto?

·      What types of land uses would you like to see more of in Hutto?

·      What types of residential housing would you like to see more of?

·      What types of businesses would you like to see more of in Hutto?

·      In your opinion, what kind of development does Hutto currently have too much of?

·      In your opinion, what should be the city’s highest priority when considering amendments to the future land-use map?

·      How concerned are you about the outcome of the future land-use map amendment process?

·      How do you plan to participate in the future land-use map amendment process?

Helen Ramirez, Hutto executive director of business & development services, said public input is important to the process.

“We would like our residents to fill out a survey and attend the meetings,” Ramirez said. “They give us important feedback.”
By Joe Warner
Joe Warner is executive editor of Community Impact Newspaper. He previously served as managing editor for Central Texas and senior editor of the flagship Round Rock, Pflugerville and Hutto newspaper. He came to Central Texas from Metro Detroit, where he was editor and general manager of several daily and weekly publications. He is the former president of the Michigan Press Association and was on the MPA board of directors for nine years.