Market Street boutique offers luxury, custom items for homes and gifts

Luxe has offerings for jewelry, wine and home decor. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)
Luxe has offerings for jewelry, wine and home decor. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)

Luxe has offerings for jewelry, wine and home decor. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Owners Jeri Slater and Alicia Nicholas. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)
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Visitors to Luxe can stop by the bar in the center of the store. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)
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The interior of Luxe is changed around on a monthly basis, with the most recent change being for the holiday season. (Photo by Andrew Christman/Community Impact Newspaper)
Luxe Custom Collective owners Alicia Nicholas, Jeri Slater and Larry Magart said if a wine, jewelry or home decor item cannot be found at their store, they can have it made for their clients.

“We want to offer something that is not readily available elsewhere,” Nicholas said. “We want to be a place where you neither cannot get the product or the service.”

Luxe Custom Collective is a recent addition to the offerings at the Market Street shopping center on Six Pines Drive. Although the storefront opened Aug. 1, Nicholas and Slater have been coordinating to serve clients in a similar manner at the Carlton Woods neighborhood sales office, where the two met, for several years. Nicholas focused on interior design, while Slater and Magart focused on wine and jewelry.

While their individual businesses were conducted by appointment only, having a storefront location on Market Street has been a great experience so far, the owners said, though not much different than what they were used to.

Individualized products


Nicholas and Slater said they pride themselves on the products and services offered at their store.

“For us on the jewelry side, our focus is custom,” Slater said. “When you walk in the door, you will tell us what it is you like; we will sit down and have a consultation; we will ask you the same question 20 different ways just to make sure you end up with the same answer.”

Customers looking to get jewelry through Luxe are often given an estimate of two weeks for it to be made, as multiple crafters are often used in •the process.•“We want to be a place where people not only come in to shop, but have an experience,” Nicholas said.•Slater said both owners take the time to get to know their clients, which helps them come up with suggestions on return visits.

Among the selections currently available at Luxe Custom Collective are candles, handcrafted umbrellas from Italy, Houston Astros apparel and other niche products. Some pieces, such as antiques, are one-of-a-kind and cannot be reproduced.

Event venue options

In addition to the items available for sale, Luxe Custom Collective hosts events, such as the monthly wine club Slater runs.

Magart said the store has hosted wine and dinner pairings in the past, where a chef is brought in and a menu is specifically built to complement the wine selections.

Magart said occasionally one-time events are scheduled for interested customers, such as meeting with a winemaker for a tasting and custom dinner.

“People who could not go have asked me when we will do it again,” Slater said. “The answer I give them is, ‘Probably never.’”

Other events are still being developed, but Nicholas, Slater and Magart said they plan on keeping events revolved around their clients’ interests and feedback. The goal for Luxe Custom Collective is to become a space that offers luxury products and provides a comfortable place to meet, they said.

“Our goal is to know the customer base,” Slater said. “To understand what they are wanting. I think of us as a personal shopping experience. ... I think it makes a difference that we have it all in one location. If we do not have it, we will find it.”

This article ran in the December 2019 edition of The Woodlands. Read the full e-edition here.
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