UPDATED: Here is how Texas voters weighed in on 10 state constitutional amendments on the ballot Nov. 5

Texas capitol
Texas voters voted for or against 10 amendments to the state’s constitution Nov. 5. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Texas voters voted for or against 10 amendments to the state’s constitution Nov. 5. (Community Impact Newspaper staff)

Updated 7:30 a.m. Nov. 6

With 99% of counties reporting statewide, all but one of the Texas state constitutional amendments appear to have won voter approval in the Nov. 5 election. Only Proposition No. 1, which would allow a person to hold more than one office as municipal judge at the same time, has failed by a considerable margin. Proposition No. 9, which would exempt precious metals from ad valorem taxation if held in a precious metal repository, appears to have won by a narrow margin of about 3%. Proposition No. 10, which would allow the transfer of a law enforcement animal to a qualified caretaker in certain circumstances, passed by the largest margin.

Here are the unofficial totals as of the morning of Nov. 6. All results are unofficial until canvassed.

With 99% of counties reporting statewide, the following results are in on the Texas state constitutional amendments:

Proposition No. 1:


A total of 615,774, or 35.06% voted for, and 1,140,466, or 64.94%, voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 2:

A total of 1,135,825 or 65.05% voted for, and 510,170, or 34.95%, voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 3:

A total of 1,483,378, or 84.93% voted for, and 263,302, or 15.07%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 4:

A total of 1,318,373, or 74.96% voted for, and 440,341, or 25.04%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 5:

A total of 1,545,482, or 88.01% voted for, and 210,615, or 11.99%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 6:

A total of 1,104,303, or 63.39% voted for, and 637,735, or 36.61%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 7:

A total of 1,282,818, or 73.55% voted for, and 461,314, or 26.45%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 8:

A total of 1,343,689, or 76.84%, voted for, and 404,973, or 23.16%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 9:

A total of 874,369, or 51.71% voted for, and 816,511, or 48.29%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 10

A total of 1,650,834, or 94.04% voted for, and 104,717, or 5.96%, voted against the measure.

Updated 11:30 p.m.

With 97% of counties reporting statewide, the following results are in on the Texas state constitutional amendments:

Proposition No. 1:

A total of 535,853, or 34.63% voted for, and 1,011,319, or 65.37%, voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 2:

A total of 989,764 or 64.38% voted for, and 547,520, or 35.62%, voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 3:

A total of 1,313,866, or 85.4% voted for, and 224,541, or 14.6%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 4:

A total of 1,179,220, or 76.13% voted for, and 369,775, or 23.87%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 5:

A total of 1,361,142, or 88.01% voted for, and 185,424, or 11.99%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 6:

A total of 967,786, or 63.08% voted for, and 566,496, or 36.92%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 7:

A total of 1,123,861, or 73.19% voted for, and 411,778, or 26.81%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 8:

A total of 1,177,742, or 76.5%, voted for, and 361,843, or 23.5%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 9:

A total of 789,306, or 52.47% voted for, and 715,110, or 47.53%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 10

A total of 1,460,225, or 94.03% voted for, and 92,777, or 5.97%, voted against the measure.

Updated 10:17 p.m.

With 93% of counties reporting, the following results are in on the Texas state constitutional amendments:

Proposition No. 1:

A total of 414,985, or 33.93% voted for, and 808,051, or 66.07%, voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 2:

A total of 773,655, or 63.74% voted for, and 440,185, or 26.36% voted against the proposition.

Proposition No. 3:

A total of 1,043,858, or 85.86% voted for, and 171,945, or 14.14% voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 4:

A total of 946,096, or 77.34% voted for, and 277,145, or 22.55% voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 5:

A total of 1,074,087, or 87.95% voted for, and 147,126, or 12.05% voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 6:

A total of 778,062, or 63.21% voted for, and 452,801, or 36.79% voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 7:

A total of 896,501, or 72.79% voted for, and 335,077, or 27.21%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 8:

A total of 941,954, or 76.27%, voted for, and 293,074, or 23.73%, voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 9:

A total of 644,268, or 53.7% voted for, and 555,466, or 46.3% voted against the measure.

Proposition No. 10

A total of 1,162,491, or 93.81% voted for, and 76,721, or 6.19%, voted against the measure.

Posted 8:10 p.m.

Texas voters weighed in on 10 constitutional amendments in the Nov. 5 election. Here is the ballot language for each amendment and how many votes each received for or against the measure. All votes are unofficial until canvassed.

As of 7:49 p.m. with 81 of 254 counties, or 31% of the total vote:



Proposition No. 1

“The constitutional amendment permitting a person to hold more than one office as a municipal judge at the same time.”

A total of 169,582, or 34.33%, voted yes and 314,444, or 65.67%, voted no.



Proposition No. 2

“The constitutional amendment providing for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the Texas Water Development Board in an amount not to exceed $200 million to provide financial assistance for the development of certain projects in economically distressed areas.”

A total of 322,795, or 65.69%, voted yes and 168,623, or 34.31%, voted no



Proposition No. 3

“The constitutional amendment authorizing the Legislature to provide for a temporary exemption from ad valorem taxation for a portion of the appraised value of certain property damaged by a disaster.”

A total of 425,140, or 86.5%, voted yes, and 66,323, or 13.5%, voted no.

Proposition No. 4

“The constitutional amendment prohibiting the imposition of an individual income tax, including a tax on an individual’s share of partnership and unincorporated association income.”

A total of 357,103, or 72.54%, voted yes, and 135,180, or 27.46%, voted no.



Proposition No. 5

“The constitutional amendment dedicating the revenue received from the existing state sales and use taxes that are imposed on sporting goods to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission to protect Texas’ natural areas, water quality, and history by acquiring, managing and improving state and local parks and historic sites while not increasing the rate of the state sales and use taxes.”

A total of 423,038, or 85.94%, voted yes, and 69,232, or 14.06%, voted no.



Proposition No. 6

“The constitutional amendment authorizing the Legislature to increase by $3 billion the maximum bond amount authorized for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.”

A total of 323,835, or 66.09%, voted yes, and 166,185, or 33.91%, voted no.



Proposition No. 7

“The constitutional amendment allowing increased distributions to the available school fund.”

A total of 364,350, or 74.35%, voted yes, and 125,692, or 25.65%, voted no.



Proposition No. 8

“The constitutional amendment providing for the creation of the flood infrastructure fund to assist in the financing of drainage, flood mitigation and flood control projects.”

A total of 387,900, or 78.82%, voted yes, and 104,235, or 21.18%, voted no.



Proposition No. 9

“The constitutional amendment authorizing the Legislature to exempt from ad valorem taxation precious metal held in a precious metal depository located in this state.”

A total of 256,468, or 53.69%, voted yes, and 221,182, or 46.31%, voted no.



Proposition No. 10

“The constitutional amendment to allow the transfer of a law enforcement animal to a qualified caretaker in certain circumstances.”

A total of 461,503, or 93.34%, voted yes, and 32,919, or 6.66%, voted no.

By Vanessa Holt
A resident of the Houston area since 2011, Vanessa began working in community journalism in her home state of New Jersey in 1996. She joined Community Impact Newspaper in 2016 as a reporter for the Spring/Klein edition and became editor of that paper in March 2017 and editor of The Woodlands edition in January 2019.


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