Missouri City City Council expands business facade improvement program boundaries

The second and final reading on an ordinance amendment to expand the city's facade improvement program has been approved. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)
The second and final reading on an ordinance amendment to expand the city's facade improvement program has been approved. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

The second and final reading on an ordinance amendment to expand the city's facade improvement program has been approved. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

Business owners along Texas Parkway who were previously ineligible to receive facade improvement funding from the city of Missouri City may now be eligible.

Missouri City City Council unanimously approved an amendment to the original ordinance during its March 7 meeting to expand the boundaries of the city’s Facade Improvement Incentive program, designed to promote exterior enhancements and visual improvements to commercial real estate property along Texas Parkway from Hwy. 90 to Cartwright Road and Cartwright from Texas Parkway to Dulles Avenue, according to the March 7 agenda documents.

With the second and final approval of the amendment, the boundary has been expanded to include Texas Parkway between the Missouri City portion of Texas Parkway or South Gessner Road, from the intersection of Sam Houston Parkway and Gessner to the eastern city limit line, and along Cartwright between Texas Parkway and Dulles.

According to officials, the expansion comes after the city received applications outside of the original project boundaries.

So far, out of the program’s $1 million budget, the city allocated $200,000 for a 61,668-square-foot shopping center called Quail Valley Plaza, located on Cartwright.


“I think that expanding the corridor for the facade program will be very helpful as well,” said Aubrey Nettles, the city’s executive director of economic development, during the council’s Feb. 21 meeting.
By Hunter Marrow
Hunter Marrow came to Community Impact Newspaper in January 2020. Before that, Hunter covered local news in Ontario, OR for three years, covering municipal issues, crime, and education across Malheur County and across the border into Idaho.