Quail Valley Plaza work approved in first Missouri City Facade Improvement Program project

Quail Valley Plaza, a nearly 62,00-square-foot shopping center on Cartwright Road, has been given the green light as Missouri City’s first Facade Improvement Program contract. (Courtesy Pexels)
Quail Valley Plaza, a nearly 62,00-square-foot shopping center on Cartwright Road, has been given the green light as Missouri City’s first Facade Improvement Program contract. (Courtesy Pexels)

Quail Valley Plaza, a nearly 62,00-square-foot shopping center on Cartwright Road, has been given the green light as Missouri City’s first Facade Improvement Program contract. (Courtesy Pexels)

Facade improvements at a 7-acre shopping center on Cartwright Road have been given the green light by the Missouri City City Council in what represents the city’s first approval in its Facade Improvement Program.

Quail Valley Plaza, a 61,668-square-foot shopping center at 2601 Cartwright Road, Missouri City, was approved through a 7-0 vote of the City Council to receive $200,000 in reimbursed costs, the maximum reimbursement allowed through the program. That is out of a total project cost of $586,300, which includes painting-related work, signs and landscape work, parking lot repaving and restriping, and new exterior lighting, according to a Feb. 21 agenda report.


An internal staff committee, the Texas Parkway/Cartwright Road Advisory Committee, and the Magnolia Economic Development Committee all recommended the approval of the application and subsequent agreement. The property owner will be paid a maximum of $200,000 after the work is completed, and receipts are verified, according to the agenda report. After this agreement is executed, the owner will have 18 months to complete the project and submit receipts.

“We started this committee, and within eight months, the residents have been working extremely hard,” Missouri City Mayor Robin J. Elackatt said. “That shows the progress. Those residents do show up to every single meeting. And sometimes you don’t see the aftermath like you do with other committees—because this is a small-business committee—but this has been a continual process of what the corridor can do.”
By Hunter Marrow
Hunter Marrow came to Community Impact Newspaper in January 2020. Before that, Hunter covered local news in Ontario, OR for three years, covering municipal issues, crime, and education across Malheur County and across the border into Idaho.