Flood control district completes Phase 1 of Aldine Westfield Stormwater Detention Basin

Phase 1 is designed to hold 667 acre-feet, or roughly 217 million gallons of stormwater, while Phase 2—which is still under design—is expected to hold an additional 600 acre-feet, or 190 million gallons of stormwater, upon completion. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)
Phase 1 is designed to hold 667 acre-feet, or roughly 217 million gallons of stormwater, while Phase 2—which is still under design—is expected to hold an additional 600 acre-feet, or 190 million gallons of stormwater, upon completion. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

Phase 1 is designed to hold 667 acre-feet, or roughly 217 million gallons of stormwater, while Phase 2—which is still under design—is expected to hold an additional 600 acre-feet, or 190 million gallons of stormwater, upon completion. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

The Harris County Flood Control District recently completed construction on Phase 1 of the Aldine Westfield Stormwater Detention Basin in the Greens Bayou watershed, district officials announced in an April 20 news release.

According to the release, the $6.94 million project was funded through the district's capital improvements program and 2018 bond program. Located south of Greens Road and north of Beltway 8 just off Aldine Westfield Road, the two-phase project is expected to reduce flood risks in the Greens Bayou watershed by taking in excess stormwater during heavy rain events and then releasing it back into the channel once the threat of flooding has passed.

According to the release, Phase 1 is designed to hold 667 acre-feet, or roughly 217 million gallons of stormwater, while Phase 2—which is still under design—is expected to hold an additional 600 acre-feet, or 190 million gallons of stormwater, upon completion.

"The completion of Phase 1 of this project brings us closer to providing flood protection to some of the most flood-prone neighborhoods in our County," Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis said in a statement. "The Greens Bayou Watershed has been long overdue for this type of investment, and I am glad that our county's equity guidelines have allowed us to prioritize the people and neighborhoods that most need flood protection."

According to Alan Black, director of operations for HCFCD, the district submitted an application to the Texas General Land Office asking for $10 million for Phase 2 of the Aldine Westfield Stormwater Detention Basin, but district officials learned in March that the project was not awarded the grant. However, Black said the district also included the project in the GLO's Hurricane Harvey funding, so officials are hopeful Phase 2 could still receive funding.


According to the release, the project is part of the overall flood risk reduction plan for the mid-reach stretch of Greens Bayou, which includes 11 miles of channel conveyance improvements and the construction of four the stormwater detention basins. In addition to the completion of Phase 1 of the Aldine Westfield Stormwater Detention Basin, the district recently completed both the Kuyekndahl and Glen Forest stormwater detention basins, while construction on Phase 1 of the Lauder Stormwater Detention Basin is ongoing.

Kelly Schafler contributed to this report.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.