Construction wraps up on two stormwater detention basins reducing flood risk for 1,100 structures along Greens Bayou

The Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 894 acre-feet, or 291.3 million gallons of stormwater through three interconnected stormwater detention basins, while the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 2,325 acre-feet, or 757.6 million gallons of stormwater. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)
The Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 894 acre-feet, or 291.3 million gallons of stormwater through three interconnected stormwater detention basins, while the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 2,325 acre-feet, or 757.6 million gallons of stormwater. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

The Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 894 acre-feet, or 291.3 million gallons of stormwater through three interconnected stormwater detention basins, while the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 2,325 acre-feet, or 757.6 million gallons of stormwater. (Courtesy Harris County Flood Control District)

The Harris County Flood Control District recently completed construction on two Greens Bayou stormwater detention basins, according to an April 1 news release.

The two recently completed projects include the Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin, which is located on a 160-acre site east of I-45 near Greens Road, and the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin, which is located south of Kuykendahl Road and west of Ella Boulevard.

According to the release, the Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 894 acre-feet, or 291.3 million gallons of stormwater through three interconnected stormwater detention basins, while the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin is designed to hold 2,325 acre-feet, or 757.6 million gallons of stormwater.

"Every Harris County family—regardless of their ZIP code—should have the same level of flood protection during severe weather," Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis said in a statement. "These detention basins will provide much-needed improvements in flood mitigation to some of our most vulnerable neighborhoods. I will keep fighting so that we continue to follow our equity guidelines and prioritize projects in these communities with long histories of chronic flooding."

The two projects were funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency through the Hurricane Ike Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. According to the release, the flood control district matched the $39.2 million grant award for a total construction cost of $63.7 million.


As part of the Glen Forest Stormwater Detention Basin, the flood control district constructed nearly 4 acres of native tree and shrub plantings and stormwater quality treatment wetlands, the release states. Natural channel design features were also incorporated to provide environmental and water quality enhancements.

Similarly, the Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basin also incorporated 22 acres of native tree and shrub plantings, nearly 13 acres of stormwater quality treatment wetlands and 14 acres of other created wetlands. As part of the project, Greens Bayou Tributary P145-00-00 was also enhanced and stabilized with natural stable channel design features, which aim to help minimize erosion, stabilize the banks, slow the flow of water, shade the water and create a habitat for birds and other wildlife, the release states.

"Together, the Glen Forest and Kuykendahl Stormwater Detention Basins are expected to reduce the risk of flooding for approximately 1,100 structures along Greens Bayou," the release reads

According to the release, the two stormwater detention basins are part of the overall plan for the mid-reach stretch of Greens Bayou, which includes construction of 11 miles of channel conveyance improvements and two additional stormwater detention basins, Aldine-Westfield and Lauder.
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.