Harris County Clerk Diane Trautman addresses March 3 primary election pitfalls

The Barbara Bush Library, a branch of the Harris County Public Library System, is one of several polling locations in Harris County. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)
The Barbara Bush Library, a branch of the Harris County Public Library System, is one of several polling locations in Harris County. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Barbara Bush Library, a branch of the Harris County Public Library System, is one of several polling locations in Harris County. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

Three days after the Texas primary election March 3, Harris County Clerk Diane Trautman released a statement taking full responsibility for the long wait times that left some voters waiting in line until 1:30 a.m. the next morning.

According to Trautman’s statement, political parties contract with the county clerk’s office to administer the election, and the parties are responsible for agreeing on the polling locations and staffing election workers; the county clerk’s office is responsible for providing equipment and tabulating results.

This year, the political parties rejected the county’s proposal of hosting a joint primary election, which would have allowed voters to vote on any available machines, Trautman said. As such, an equal number of voting machines were allocated for each party, with each machine preprogrammed with the ballot for either the Republican primary election or the Democratic primary election—not both.

According to a report from Community Impact Newspaper’s partner ABC 13 Houston, as Harris County experienced extremely high voter turnout, with Democrats outvoting Republicans 3-1 in some locations, this resulted in long wait times for many voters. For example, the last voter to cast his vote at Texas Southern University was Hervis Rogers, who waited in line for more than six hours to cast his vote at 1:30 a.m. March 4.

“We did the best with what we had and what we believed was fair and equitable by allocating equal amounts of equipment to each party,” Trautman said in a statement. “However, we take full responsibility for the long lines and wait times and apologize to the voters and communities who were affected.”

In her statement, Trautman added that while her office has made several changes over the past 15 months to promote equity at the polls—including the implementation of countywide polling, expanded early voting hours and locations, enhanced election judge training and the addition of new college campus polling locations, such as Texas Southern University—there is still room for improvement.


Looking ahead to the May 26 primary runoff election and even further to the November general election, Trautman added her office would work to address the issues the county experienced March 3.

“We will re-evaluate machine allocations and turnout projections based on both the data we have available and feedback from the community for the primary runoff election,” Trautman said. “Moving forward, the voters of Harris County have my commitment to working together to make sure the November general election is a success. There will be more than 50 early voting locations and approximately 750 Election Day polling locations.”
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.



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