Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announces candidacy for state Rep. District 127 seat

Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announced his Republican candidacy for the state Rep. District 127 seat in a news release Oct. 19. (Community Impact Staff)
Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announced his Republican candidacy for the state Rep. District 127 seat in a news release Oct. 19. (Community Impact Staff)

Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announced his Republican candidacy for the state Rep. District 127 seat in a news release Oct. 19. (Community Impact Staff)

Image description
Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announced his Republican candidacy for Texas State Rep. District 127 in a news release Oct. 19. (Courtesy city of Humble)
Humble City Council Member Charles Cunningham announced his Republican candidacy for the state Rep. District 127 seat in a news release Oct. 19. The announcement came hours after current state Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston, announced his retirement following 10 years in the state House of Representatives.

"I want to thank Rep. Huberty for his service to our area," Cunningham said in a statement. "I look forward to fight in the Texas Legislature to enact common-sense conservative solutions to our shared challenges."


Cunningham was first appointed to fill a vacant seat on Humble City Council in September 2019 following the death of Council Member Glenn Redmon. He was later elected to Position 2 in May 2021, when he received nearly 75% of the vote over challenger Linda Greenan.

Prior to joining Humble City Council, Cunningham served as a member of the Humble ISD board of trustees for 12 years. He currently works as a distribution account consultant for CenterPoint Energy.

"I am running to ensure that the Texas dream is alive and well for our children and grandchildren," Cunningham said. "I will stand strong against the progressive mob mentality that has come to dominate national politics and instead continue to advance conservative solutions to our shared challenges right here in Texas."
By Hannah Zedaker

Editor, Spring/Klein & Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood

Hannah joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. In March 2019, she transitioned to editor of the Spring/Klein edition and later became the editor of both the Spring/Klein and Lake Houston/Humble/Kingwood editions in June 2021. Hannah covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Hannah served as associate editor of The Houstonian, interned with Community Impact Newspaper and spent time writing for the Sam Houston State University College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication and The Huntsville Item.



MOST RECENT

Montgomery County municipalities continue to receive increased sales tax allocations from the previous year as Texas recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. (Jishnu Nair/Community Impact Newspaper)
Conroe receives over $6 million in November state sales tax allocations; Montgomery County cities show continual year over year growth

Montgomery County municipalities continue to receive increased sales tax allocations from the previous year as Texas recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Commissioners on Nov. 22 voted to approve a density change to preliminary plans for The Preserve, a neighborhood that city documents said could include 565 single-family homes at the northeast corner of Teel and Panther Creek Parkways. (Courtesy city of Frisco)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Neighborhood near PGA Frisco could see larger lots; ERCOT says Texas power grid ready for expected winter demand and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 24.

A health expert with Baylor College of Medicine provides advice to stay safe and healthy while celebrating Thanksgiving with family. (Karolina Grabowska/Pexels)
Baylor College of Medicine: Tips for staying safe and healthy this Thanksgiving as the pandemic continues

Check out some helpful advice from a medical expert on how to stay safe and healthy during Thanksgiving.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott sits beside Samsung CEO Dr. Kinam Kim as he announces the company is brining a $17 billion facility to Taylor. (Screnshot via KXAN)
Samsung makes it official: Announcement from Governor's Mansion confirms $17B facility coming to Taylor

Nearly a year after Williamson County officials began pitching Samsung to bring a megafacility to the area, the electronics giant has made it official.

Included in Holy Trinity Episcopal School's $2 million expansion is the campus' new genius lab, which allows students to apply their knowledge of science, technology, engineering and math with hands-on activities and learning tools. (Courtesy Holy Trinity Episcopal School)
Lake Houston's Holy Trinity Episcopal School touts $2M expansion

Holy Trinity Episcopal School officials recently announced the completion of roughly $2 million in renovations and expansions at its Lake Houston campus.

Bill Curci is a chief operating partner for Shuck Me, a seafood restaurant in Fort Worth. (Bailey Lewis/Community Impact Newspaper)
CI TEXAS ROUNDUP: Fort Worth restaurant Shuck Me is fishing- and family-centric; a guide to Houston's 2021 Thanksgiving Day Parade and more top news

Take a look at the top five trending stories across Community Impact Newspaper’s coverage areas in Texas as of Nov. 23.

PTSD Foundation of America seeks to reduce veteran suicides

An average of 17.2 veterans died by suicide daily in 2019—a 36% increase from 2001, according to a report released by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in September.

Hebrews Coffeehouse specializes in coffee flights, an assortment of four specialty coffees with flavors changed every two weeks. (Courtesy Hebrews Coffeehouse)
From coffee trailer to storefront: Meet the owners of Hebrews Coffeehouse on FM 1488

​​​​​​​“Once we had a coffeehouse and people were coming into that house-type environment and then you start to see relationships flourish, that’s what makes our hearts beat,” Geoff said. “Coffee was a catalyst for that.”

Texas Medical Center coronavirus update: ICU numbers drop almost 20%; new hospitalizations plateau

Heading into Thanksgiving, here is the status of COVID-19 in Texas Medical Center hospitals.

Read below to find out where to donate items or money to local organizations. (Photo courtesy Canva)
Where to donate for Thanksgiving this year in Houston

For those looking to give items or monetary donations for Thanksgiving this year, check out these organizations that help feed Houstonians on Thanksgiving.

Snow covers I-45 in Houston during Winter Storm Uri in February. (Shawn Arrajj/Community Impact Newspaper)
ERCOT: Texas power grid ready for expected winter demand

The state's electric grid manager also said extreme weather could once again result in outages.