Here’s what to expect at the Addicks Reservoir watershed community meeting on Thursday, June 21

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Updated 4:08 p.m. June 18: This story has been updated to include additional information on the Addicks Reservoir watershed meeting. 

Harris County has started holding community meetings to get feedback from residents regarding how to spend funds now that commissioners have set the date for a $2.5 billion referendum for flooding and drainage projects throughout Harris County.

The Addicks Reservoir watershed meeting, which concerns the Katy area, is set for 6-8 p.m. Thursday, June 21 at the Richard & Meg Weekley Community Center, 8440 Greenhouse Road, Cypress.

Prior to the bond election, Harris County officials are asking residents to participate in community engagement meetings to provide feedback to the county’s administration officials and engineers to ensure the community has an opportunity to provide feedback, said Karen Hastings, project communications manager with the Harris County Flood Control District.

According to Harris County watershed maps, the Addicks watershed includes S. Mayde Creek and Bear Creek. Projects the county is already considering include a $19 million project southeast of the intersection of Clay and Mason roads to increase water flow capacity for S. Mayde Creek; a $94 million stormwater detention basin near the intersection of the Grand Parkway and Clay Road; another detention basin on S. Mayde Creek just south of Morton Road for $16 million; and the replacement of the S. Mayde Creek Bridge on Greenhouse Road for $15 million.

A meeting has not yet been scheduled for the Barker Reservoir watershed, which includes Mason Creek. Several repair projects are in development for Mason Creek, according to information provided by HCFCD. The only major project is a $750,000 study being conducted jointly with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the effectiveness and operation of both the Addicks and Barker reservoirs.

Hastings said there are many projects county-wide in a planning or “shovel-ready” stage that have been designed by Harris County engineers. Repairs to the Addicks Reservoir watershed are already underway.

Hastings said it is important for residents to be aware of the community meetings.

“We believe, however, that residents have knowledge about their particular neighborhood, and ideas that we should consider,” Hastings said via email.

Hastings said public input has already been heard from residents suggesting de-silting Cypress Creek and other tributaries throughout the county. New projects to improve Sims Bayou tributaries that were suggested by residents at a June 5 meeting have already been added to the county’s project list.

“We are updating the proposed project list weekly based on input from the community meetings,” Hastings said.

Those attending the meeting can expect brief opening statements by county officials, Hastings said. After that, staff will be available to answer questions and record flood mitigation suggestions from county residents. However, residents do not have to go to the meetings to participate.

“People can participate in various ways, including on paper or by phone at a later time that is more convenient for them,” Hastings said.

A list of projects currently being considered or in-progress by HCFCD can be found here.

To provide input on the HCFCD bond program, Harris County residents may call 713-684-4107 or submit feedback in writing to:

Harris County Flood Control District
Attn: Bond Program Communications
9900 Northwest Freeway
Houston, TX 77092.

Harris County residents who are unable to attend the meetings may still provide feedback following the instructions in this flier. (via Zac Ezzone/Community Impact Newspaper)

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R. Hans Miller
R. Hans Miller joined the Community Impact team in June 2017. He is a recent graduate of Texas State University's College of Journalism and Mass Communication, a U.S. Army veteran, husband and father. He is originally from Montana. He has written for VoiceBox Media and the San Marcos Daily Record, among others. He covers city government, emergency services, local business development and other topics for the Katy area.
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