Updated: Rainfall in Katy and Greater Houston leads to dramatic flooding

Updated 9:05 p.m.

Due to the unprecedented rains brought by Tropical Storm Harvey to the Katy area, the city of Katy has postponed its next council meeting until Thursday Aug. 31.

Agenda items include an interlocal agreement between the city and the Katy Development Authority for an extension of Katy Hockley Cut Off Road and the Waller County Mobility Plan, as well as a contract with Colorado County Oil Company for gasoline and diesel fuel delivery. The meeting takes place 4:30 p.m. at 901 Avenue C, Katy. 281-391-4800. www.cityofkaty.com

Updated 4:45 p.m.

Katy city offices will be closed Monday and Tuesday while officials grapple with the effects of Tropical Storm Harvey. The city announced on Facebook by mid-afternoon Sunday that residents whose homes suffered wind or flood damage should contact Katy's Office of Emergency Management.



The city also released a log of closed streets and areas with high water.



Meanwhile, Katy ISD will be closed until Sept. 5, including all campuses and facilities, while Fort Bend County offices also remain closed through Tuesday.

Published 9:50 a.m.

Overnight rains from Tropical Storm Harvey brought sever flooding throughout Harris County, leading to more than 1,000 water rescues, according to County Judge Ed Emmett.

The Harris County Flood Control District reported at 1:30 a.m. that widespread 24-hour rainfall totals were 8-12 inches over much of the county, with isolated totals between 13-14 inches in Houston and north Waller County.

Those levels grew by 8:13 a.m., when the highest 24-hour rainfall was 20.48 inches at the Berry Bayou and Nevada Avenue gauge in southeast Houston, according to the Harris County Flood Warning Tool.

In the Katy area, 24-hour rainfalls at 8:13 a.m. Sunday ranged from 6.28 inches at the Willow Fork Creek and Pederson Road gauge on the Waller-Fort Bend counties line, to 12.04 inches at Bear Creek and Clay Road.

Katy Mayor Chuck Brawner warned residents via Facebook to stay in their homes and not take unnecessary risks. Avenue D in the city is closed, he said.



Simon VanDyk, public information officer of Harris County Emergency Services District No. 48, said his department performed two rescues between Saturday and Sunday morning, although he said neither rescue required the district to use a boat.

"For the most part today people are listening," he said. "'Turn around, don't drown' — it’s a cliche but it’s really true right now."

So far, VanDyk said the most common call ESD No. 48 has received is for commercial fire alarms going off in apartment complexes. However, he said they merely appear to be malfunctioning from the storm.

Since Friday, VanDyk said more roadways in the Katy area were likely to be flooded while waters may have receded in some spots. See which roads were identified as potentially problematic between Friday and Sunday on the map below:



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