Name change proposed for Houston post office to honor fallen Harris County sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal

Public officials, law enforcement officers and members of the Sikh community mourn the loss of Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal on Oct. 2, 2019. (Courtesy Harris County Sheriff's Office)
Public officials, law enforcement officers and members of the Sikh community mourn the loss of Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal on Oct. 2, 2019. (Courtesy Harris County Sheriff's Office)

Public officials, law enforcement officers and members of the Sikh community mourn the loss of Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal on Oct. 2, 2019. (Courtesy Harris County Sheriff's Office)

Nearly one year after Harris County Sheriff’s Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was fatally shot while conducting a traffic stop in the Cy-Fair area, a resolution to rename a post office after him unanimously passed in the U.S. House of Representatives on Sept. 14. The bill will now be sent to the U.S. Senate for consideration.

According to the U.S. Postal Service, naming postal facilities in honor of important local and national individuals dates back to the 1960s and is now one of the most common forms of legislation enacted in Congress.


U.S. Rep. Lizzie Fletcher, D-Houston, proposed House Resolution 5317 to propose the post office facility at 315 Addicks Howell Road, Houston, be renamed the Deputy Sandeep Singh Dhaliwal Post Office. The entire Texas delegation co-sponsored Fletcher’s bill, according to a press release.

Dhaliwal was a 10-year veteran of the HCSO and was remembered for his faith and service to the community at a memorial last October. He was also the first Sikh American in Texas to receive a policy accommodation to wear articles of faith, including his turban and beard, while serving.

“Deputy Dhaliwal established deep, meaningful connections with the community he bravely served,” Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said in a statement. “On behalf of the men and women who proudly served at his side, I want to thank Congresswoman Fletcher for working to honor Deputy Dhaliwal by putting his name on a building that is so integral in strengthening connections in our society.”


By Danica Lloyd

Editor, Cy-Fair

Danica joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in 2016. As editor, she continues to cover local government, education, health care, real estate, development, business and transportation in Cy-Fair. Her experience prior to CI includes studying at the Washington Journalism Center and interning at a startup incubator in D.C., serving as editor-in-chief of Union University's student magazine and online newspaper, reporting for The Jackson Sun and freelancing for other publications in Arkansas and Tennessee.