UPDATED: Willis ISD voters approve Proposition A; stadium, natatorium asks narrowly fail

Willis ISD’s 2022 bond package asks voters to consider approving three propositions totaling $225 million on the May 7 ballot. (Jishnu Nair/Community Impact Newspaper)
Willis ISD’s 2022 bond package asks voters to consider approving three propositions totaling $225 million on the May 7 ballot. (Jishnu Nair/Community Impact Newspaper)

Willis ISD’s 2022 bond package asks voters to consider approving three propositions totaling $225 million on the May 7 ballot. (Jishnu Nair/Community Impact Newspaper)

Updated 10:32 p.m.

Voters in Willis ISD approved Proposition A on the May 7 ballot with 55.89% of voters supporting the proposition, according to unofficial results from Montgomery and San Jacinto counties. Proposition A includes funds for a middle school, elementary school, fine arts addition at Lynn Lucas Middle School and other projects, according to district information.

However, propositions B and C—calling for a football stadium and natatorium, respectively—did not pass. Proposition B failed with a narrow margin of 2,007 votes against—or 51.37% opposed—and 1,900 votes in support, election results show.

Proposition C failed with a narrow margin of 1,972 votes against—or 50.54% opposed—and 1,930 votes in support, results show.

"We are obviously very excited that [Proposition] A passed. This is the largest bond in the history of the school district," Superintendent Tim Harkrider said in a statement on election night. "We are disappointed that [propositions] B and C didn't pass. We will not have a local pool for our kids to swim in, and we will have to continue to limit the number of people who can enjoy our football games. But again, we are grateful for the support of [Proposition] A and ready to get started."


All results are unofficial until canvassed.

Posted 8:03 p.m.

Two of Willis ISD's three bond propositions totaling $225 million on the May 7 ballot are passing, early voting results from Montgomery and San Jacinto counties show.

The majority of WISD is located within Montgomery County with a small part of the district residing within San Jacinto County, district officials said.

WISD trustees voted in February to place three propositions on the May 7 ballot with Proposition A totaling $143 million for a middle school, an elementary school, a fine arts addition at Lynn Lucas Middle School, baseball and softball fields, playground equipment and land, according to WISD.

Early voting results—which include early and absentee votes—for both counties show Proposition A passing with 56.75% of votes, or 1,563 ballots cast in support.

Proposition B totals $62.56 million and includes funds for a football stadium to replace the 48-year-old Yates Stadium, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. According to early voting tallies from Montgomery and San Jacinto counties, 50.33% of voters—or 1,384 votes—opposed Proposition B and 49.67% support the proposition, a difference of 18 votes.

Proposition C totals $19.39 million for a natatorium—or aquatic center, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. Early voting tallies from both counties show 50.87% of voters supporting the proposition and 49.13% opposing the proposition, a difference of 48 votes.

About 2,700 early and absentee votes were cast in Montgomery County for each proposition, and 22 votes were cast in San Jacinto County for each proposition, data from the counties shows.

All results are unofficial until canvassed.

Visit communityimpact.com/voter-guide for updated results throughout the night on May 7.
By Anna Lotz

Editor, Tomball/Magnolia & Conroe/Montgomery

Anna joined Community Impact Newspaper as a reporter in May 2016 after graduating with a degree in journalism from Cedarville University in Cedarville, Ohio. In July 2017, she transitioned to editor for the Tomball/Magnolia edition. She began covering the communities of Conroe and Montgomery as well in 2020. Anna covers education, local government, transportation, business, real estate development and nonprofits in these communities. Prior to CI, Anna served as editor-in-chief of Cedars, interned with the National Journalism Center in Washington, D.C., and spent time writing for the Springfield News-Sun and Xenia Daily Gazette.