Katy City Council candidates step forward for May election

The Katy City Council meets at Katy City Hall and has three seats for voters to fill this election season.

The Katy City Council meets at Katy City Hall and has three seats for voters to fill this election season.

Residents of Katy and will go to the polls May 5 to choose city council members to take office later that month. Wards A and B and the at large council seat are up for grabs, with two candidates campaigning for each position.

City Council incumbents Ray Boothe and Durran Dowdle are running for reelection.

Steve Pierson, who currently holds the at large council position, meets his term limit in May and is leaving office.
Ward A

Boothe is the current council member for Ward A. He is an insurance executive who has lived in Katy for 26 years. His opponent in the race is Janet Corte, a retired IT consultant and resident for 29 years.

Corte and Boothe both indicated that flood mitigation would be their primary focus, if elected. Boothe added that his second priority would be to maintain and improve infrastructure and city services.

“I’m concerned that growth is coming to Katy,” Corte said. “I want to see city council work better with developers to get in front of change and manage change. [The city needs to] Increase services to meet demand.”
Ward B

Dowdle represents Ward B and currently serves as Mayor Pro Tem. He has lived in Katy for 30 years and is a project manager for an area construction firm. He will be facing Sam Pearson, a Katy resident for 16 years and a retired peace officer and minister.

Dowdle also said that his first priority would be flood mitigation and said that he plans to push forward with the current mitigation plans recommended by Costello, Inc. The engineering firm has worked with the city since the 2016 Tax Day Floods to reduce flood risks. He said his second priority would be updating old infrastructure that had not been properly documented when the city was younger.

“With new developments and old developments, some of the things that should have been meshed together didn’t come out as they should have,” Dowdle said. “Let’s back up. Let’s look at some of our older neighborhoods and see what we need to do to take care of them.”

Pearson did not respond to inquiries in time for publication of this story.
At Large

Larry Gore, a local entrepreneur will run for the at large council position against Chris Harris, a criminal justice analyst for the U.S. Department of Justice. Gore has been a Katy resident for 15 years, while Harris has been in Katy for 12 years.

Gore and Harris both said their top priority, if elected, would be flood control measures. Gore said his second priority would be working to advocate more to respond to the concerns of citizens and be increase responsiveness to community concerns. Harris said that his second priority would be improvements to city services while being fiscally responsible.


MOST RECENT

(Community Impact Newspaper staff)
Texas Medical Center coronavirus updates: Testing positivity rate continues to climb, surpassing 11%

Between July 26 and Aug. 1, an average of 11.5% of patients tested positive for COVID-19.

The building will house offices for several Precinct 4 entities, such as the justice of the peace. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Waller County Courthouse Annex now open

The building will house offices for several Precinct 4 entities, such as the justice of the peace.

Mahesh's Kitchen, an upscale Indian restaurant, is preparing to open in Sugar Land Town Square near the end of August. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)
Upscale Indian restaurant coming to Sugar Land; Freebirds Tex-Mex to open in The Woodlands and more Houston-area news

Read the latest business and community news from the Houston area, including that E-bikes will not be permitted on The Woodlands Township pathways.

student writing on paper
Texas Legislature allows parents to opt for students to repeat grade levels or courses

Senate Bill 1697 is effective for the 2021-22 school year.

The county budget will be filed by September, according to Pamela Gubbels, Fort Bend County's director of finance and investments. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Fort Bend County to potentially lower tax rate by $0.006

The county budget will be filed by September, according to Pamela Gubbels, Fort Bend County's director of finance and investments.

The start to the school year for KISD is weeks away, and online registration for new students is open now. (Courtesy Fotolia)
Final countdown: Katy ISD students return to school Aug. 18

With the fall semester weeks away, new students can now enroll online, and returning KISD students can register starting Aug. 2.

School supplies will be exempt from the 8.25% sales tax Aug. 6-8. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
What to know before the statewide tax-free weekend Aug. 6-8

Customers will not have to pay the standard 8.25% sales tax on select clothing, footwear, school supplies and backpacks under $100.

The study by Mason Tillman Associates will assess the utilization of minority and women-owned businesses countywide. (Community Impact Staff)
Fort Bend County to enact business disparity study

The study by Mason Tillman Associates will assess the utilization of minority and women-owned businesses countywide.

Main Chick Hot Chicken opened its first brick-and-mortar location July 23 in Sugar Land. (Courtesy Main Chick Hot Chicken)
Main Chick Hot Chicken opens in Sugar Land; Urban Bird Hot Chicken coming to Cy-Fair and more Houston-area news

Read the latest business and community news for the Houston area, including two new chicken restaurants.

The meals will be available at no cost for all students with zero requirements for qualification. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)
Harmony Public Schools to offer free meals to all students

The meals will be available at no cost for all students with zero requirements for qualification.

Houston-area residents will be able to apply online for a one-time payment of $1,500 from July 28-Aug. 11. (File photo)
$30M COVID Relief Fund opens for Harris County residents as eviction moratorium ends

Sourced by funding from the American Rescue Plan Act, eligible residents will receive a one-time payment of $1,500 to support urgent needs.