P-6 Farms

Carey (left) and Bo Poole operate P-6 farms, which was started in 1973 by Bou2019s parents, nRaymond (not pictured) and Pam Poole (top right).

Carey (left) and Bo Poole operate P-6 farms, which was started in 1973 by Bou2019s parents, nRaymond (not pictured) and Pam Poole (top right).

P-6 Farms Seasonal activities[/caption]

After decades of selling cattle and hay, P-6 farms has diversified its business in recent years under the care of its second generation of owners, Bo and Carey Poole.


P-6 Farms was first opened in 1973 by Bo’s parents, Raymond and Pam Poole, as the P-6 Cattle Company—where they primarily raised and sold cattle and hay. Bo and Carey decided to take up operation of the business in 2010 because of a family illness. The couple soon decided to diversify the operation to include produce sales, berry picking, field trips and an annual festival, Carey said.


“Diversification is a big thing with farmers—you know, not putting your eggs in one basket,” Carey said.


The farm produces a variety of fruits and vegetables throughout the growing season, including tomatoes, peas, cucumbers, cantaloupe, watermelon, peppers and corn. The couple sells the produce out of the farm’s store, which also features merchandise, produce and meat from other local farms.


“Agriculture is a dying breed, and I would love nothing more than to get back to our roots,” Bo said. “I want to encourage people to learn more about what agriculture has to offer.”


For the fifth consecutive year, the farm is hosting its fall festival and corn maze. Opening Sept. 26, the festival includes activities, such as hayrides, pig races and a 65-foot jumping pillow. The festival will run through Nov. 14 and is open on weekends for visitors and weekdays for field trips.


The farm’s corn maze is redesigned every year and has two separate sections: a 2-acre beginner’s maze and a more elaborate 6-acre maze. This year the maze is designed as a tribute to the farming industry, Carey said.


In order to ensure visitor safety, Corn Cops can be found throughout the maze to help participants who have to leave the maze, are lost or need assistance, Carey said.


“A lot of the people [who] come out make a tradition out of it, so we have built relationships,” Carey said. “It really [embodies] what we want as far as family values and making memories that last a lifetime.”



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